Introducing: Thomas Enevoldsen

Hello and welcome to Team Snapcardster! Could you give a quick introduction of your self?

My name is Thomas Enevoldsen, I’m 29 years old and I work full time as an attorney in Denmark. I started playing Magic in 2003 (during Mirrodin) and tournament Magic in 2004 (Champions of Kamigawa prerelease!). My first deck was a Green/Red Beast tribal deck and my last deck was a Blue/Black control deck from Danish Nationals last weekend. So I have evolved somewhat over the past 14 years.


For the people (shame on them!) who might not be too familiar with your previous accomplishments, can you highlight a few of them?

1st at World Magic Cup 2014
1st at Grand Prix Strasbourg (Legacy)
Top 4 at Grand Prix Prague (Legacy)
1st at Danish Nationals 2009
1st at Danish Nationals 2013

We have all played Magic for quite some time, and we all have different reasons to do so. What keeps your engine running after all these years?

The bigger perspective is self-realization and an ever-growing desire not to lose. On a smaller scale, what I love the most about tournament Magic is the experience of playing against opponents who care just as much about winning as you do. Everybody plays to win. To squeeze as much as possible out of every little resource the game has to offer. This mentality is not easy to find in other situations in life. People generally live recreationally – like they are playing kitchen table Magic. You don’t necessarily need to give a 100 % at work or studies, relationships even, and you’ll probably still be fine. But in Magic, if you leave an inch on the table, someone else is going to pick it up. And I love the fight for that inch.

What is your favorite format and why?

I can’t really decide. I used to believe it was legacy, since that is where most of my good results come from. From a strict game perspective, I love sealed the most, since it is essentially two games in one (building and playing), and both rewards creativity more so than other formats where most games are decided by the power of the cards and the order they were drawn in. From a fun perspective, nothing really beats team drafting, both for the team spirit on your team and the bragging rights against your opponents. There is always so much more on the line in team draft, because your pride is at stake!

Looking into the crystal ball, what does the next 12 months have in store for you MTG-wise?

Attend as many European Grand Prix as possible, play the odd Magic Online qualifiers and generally just aim to get on the Pro Tour again. Whatever format, whatever city. Just get back.

Thank you so much for taking your time. Feel free to leave your Twitter handle, so people can keep up with your magical endeavours in the future!

No problem!

Follow Thomas Enevoldsen on

Twitter: @therealenevolds

Beating Modern #2

With just a few weeks until the Danish Modern Masters event that I talked about last time, three new decks must be planned for in order for us to succeed! And by “us” I mean you guys, because unfortunately I’m not allowed to play the event, as it is also a Preliminary Pro Tour Qualifier.

#1stWorldProblems


TitanShift

Primeval Titan

This Red/Green ramp deck is put into the world to beat up on Midrange and Control decks in particular. Your ability to either jam threat after threat or put your self in a position where a lot of your top decks are lethal makes it a nightmare to be the Thoughtseize-yielding opponent unless you draw multiples. Most of the time it relies on Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle to get the job done, but a lot of the newer versions will have a respectable midrange plan as backup, should anything happen to your Valakut.

Since TitanShift needs 6+ lands and a “big” spell to win the game, we need to exploit this. This can be done quite a few ways with the most realistic ones being Spell Snare or Inquisition of Kozilek for his early ramp. Even using a Mana Leak or Logic Knot on a ramp spell can buy you a lot of time, so don’t hang on to it to counter a Primeval Titan or Scapeshift if he puts a Farseek on the stack early and you have the mana available. This also means that they mulligan worse than other decks and is punished much harder by missing land drops.

Of course land destruction like Fulminator Mage and Tectonic Edge are effective against this deck, but that’s like lifegain vs. Burn, so I’m not going to spend a lot of time explaining that. What I can say is that destroying a Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle and then exiling the remaining three with Surgical Extraction is something I foresee people turning to again. Fulminator Mage is great against other matchups like Control and Tron, and Surgical Extraction will always help you out for various graveyard-oriented matchups over the course of any given Modern tournament.

Sideboard Options

Disdainful StrokeRuned HaloAven Mindcensor


Eldrazi Tron

Eldrazi Temple

For a lot of months I was convinced that Eldrazi Tron was a bad version of regular Tron and a bad version of Bant Eldrazi, but things have changed. I now understand that the mash-up of these two archetypes makes the deck both resilient and unpredictable for opponents. Cards like Fulminator Mage and Crumble to Dust are slamdunk allstars against regular Tron, but against this deck you can easily find your self behind on board when you cast these land destruction spells. Don’t pay 3-4 mana for killing a land when you can cast Spreading Seas or activate Ghost Quarter instead. Bringing in Fulminator Mage can of course be correct depending on your 75, but I felt like this comparison would make my point clear.

Eldrazi Tron is looking to turn off a high percentage of your deck with Chalice of the Void and then spend the rest of the game casting monsters with relevant abilities. Thought-Knot Seer will take your best card, Reality Smasher will finish you off quickly and Walking Ballista will either eat your board of small creatures or deal the final points of damage to the dome.

A lot of games playing against Eldrazi Tron are decided by your “ability” to draw the right answer at the right time. You want Spell Snare or Abrupt Decay when Chalice of the Void goes on the stack, you want Fatal Push and a fetch land when they have a Thought-Knot Seer and you want Liliana of the Veil when their only threat is Reality Smasher. Easier said than done, but it’s the name of the game and why Eldrazi Tron is a good strategy in Modern.

Ironically, a strategy like TitanShift is very good against Eldrazi Tron because you don’t care about your converted mana cost 1 spells, their clock is not super fast and they can do little to nothing about your big green spells.

Sideboard Options

Ceremonious RejectionStony Silence


Gifts Storm

Grapeshot

Storm got a much needed boost when Baral, Chief of Compliance was printed. Aside from making Commander players’ lives miserable, Baral is the redundancy the Storm deck needed next to Goblin Electromancer to be top tier again. These 7-8 creatures play a huge roll in the outcome of your matchup against Storm, so kill them at all costs – even removing one with a Path to Exile on turn two is the correct play. The land they search up is of course not optimal, but neither is them untapping with the creature in play. There are some scenarios where you want your opponent to invest a Ritual before you kill their creature, but be very careful with experimenting with this, as it could easily cost you the game.

The easiest path to victory for Storm is resolving a Gifts Ungiven, playing some Rituals and then Past in Flames to do it all over and get the lethal Grapeshot after replaying all the Rituals and Gifts Ungiven, and there for attacking the graveyard is very effective. Rest in Peace and Grafdigger’s Cage come to mind. However, Storm players will sideboard with this in mind, and they have very good tools for it. Empty the Warrens offers you a victory condition that doesn’t care about the grayeyard, while Blood Moon – sometimes powered out turn two with the help of a Ritual – will make tricolered decks sad. The difficult part about beating Storm is that they ask so much of you in sideboarded games. If you want to beat it playing a non-combo deck, you must get lucky or fulfill these criteria:

Kill the bear.
Attack the graveyard.
Don’t lose to Empty the Warrens.
Prepare for Blood Moon by fetching basics if you can afford to.

Sideboard Options

Engineered ExplosivesDispelRule of Law

As I mentioned last time, I enjoy your input quite a bit, so please contribute to the knowledge pool in the comments!

Introducing: Michael Bonde

Hello and welcome to Team Snapcardster! Could you give a quick introduction of your self?

Hello there! My name is Michael Bonde, I live in Aarhus in Denmark and I am 30 years old. I am partly a Magic “pro” and finishing my education this year as a teacher in English, History and Sports.


For the people (shame on them!) who might not be too familiar with your previous accomplishments, can you highlight a few of them?

Of course I will. My resume is a bit across formats:

17th PT Shadows over Innistrad (lost win & in for top 8)

3-4th at Grand Prix Strasbourg (Legacy)

3-4th at Grand Prix Madrid (Limited)

5th at Grand Prix Sao Paulo (Team Limited)

10th at Grand Prix San Diego (Limited)

1st at Bazaar of Moxen 8 (Vintage)

1st at StarCityGames Worcester (Standard)


We have all played Magic for quite some time, and we all have different reasons to do so. What keeps your engine running after all these years?

I see the game as a giant puzzle. Every new format brings something different to the mix and draws on different information from the past.

This makes almost every game different in some degree, but still within the region that one can practice and master. I love dedicating myself towards a goal of trying to become the best, within my own style of play. Being able to follow this process and see results is really something unique – for me at least.

In the beginning it was the mastering of play by play, and even though this is still an evergreen focus, more and more layers add-on which makes it even more complicated and interesting.

What is your favorite format and why?

I’m always a bit torn when someone asks me this question, because the answer is I really just love magic! The formats I often play the most are Legacy, Draft and Sealed.

Legacy is a static format where you can build up a giant database of decks, plays, matchups and try to get perfect information due to many matchups and games play out alike and there is often a right or wrong thing to do. Drafting and doing sealed are on the other hand a bit more fluid. You get to solve the “format” and every game is completely different. You need to be aware of both drafting the correct deck, color pairs, card choices in each color and compared to picks already made. Furthermore it is insanely complex and a very fun topic to dig into and discuss with peers.

Looking into the crystal ball, what does the next 12 months have in store for you MTG-wise?

First of all I am in the Pro Players Club with Silver.

My plan is to qualify for 2-3 of the Pro Tours this season and as a minimum cross the threshold for being Silver again for next season.

This means that I will be playing more Magic Online Championship on Magic Online, play a fair amount of Grand Prix’s and try and do my best at the Pro Tour scene.

Nothing is given, but I will do my best to evolve as a player and have fun while doing it.

Thank you so much for taking your time. Feel free to leave your Twitter handle, so people can keep up with your magical endeavours in the future!

Follow Michael Bonde on

Twitter: @lampalot

Magic Online: lampalot

Twitch: MichaelBonde

Beating Modern #1

Hello and welcome back, this time for the first piece of an article series about Modern! Three at a time, I will be running through the most popular Modern decks out there and tell you how to beat them in your next Modern tournament. Feel free to add more tips and tricks in the comments! Also, you can skip the prologue and go straight to the matchup guides if you live outside of Germany and the Nordic countries.

Prologue

This article series is brought to you by Snapcardster and a Danish union called “Eternal Magic Kbh“. The union started out many years ago with the intentions to play a lot of Legacy and make great tournaments for the mature audience who were not very interested in Standard. Once or twice a year, around 100 players gathered in Copenhagen to play in “Danish Legacy Masters“, and the events were always a huge success. A few years ago, Modern was added as a supported format as a reaction to the high demand and broad audience of the format. Because of the support from the state, these tournaments have way better prizes than normal tournaments at your local game store.

Because I love watching the Danish tournament scene grow, and I am privileged to be a part of Snapcardster, I had to use this amazing platform to recommend this tournament to anyone within a reasonable reach of Copenhagen. I know many players from Germany, Sweden and Norway have previously visited this tournament and always had a great time – sometimes even brought back the crown and made some friendly rivalries along the way.

You can find the event information about “Danish Modern Masters”, which is also a PPTQ, here.


Grixis Death’s Shadow

This deck is a tempo deck most of the time, but don’t underestimate its’ ability to grind with the best of them using Kolaghan’s Command and Snapcaster Mage – especially together. Its’ low land count make it possible to gain virtual card advantage over a long game of Magic where the opponent will naturally draw more lands, assuming they play more than 18-19. Also expect to face both versions of Liliana after the new planeswalker rule is in effect.

You want targeted removal spells and lots of it to beat it, preferably paired with Snapcaster Mage. Fatal Push, Engineered Explosives and Abrupt Decay do nothing against the delve creatures, and Death’s Shadow can live through Dismember some percentage of the time, while Path to Exile and Terminate do the job against all of their threats.

Death’s Shadow is weak to heavy boardstate decks like Abzan Company, Affinity and Humans because of their ability to race and deal a lot of damage out of nowhere. Similarly, if you are playing Burn, don’t Lava Spike them for three every turn. Instead you should aim to do large chunks of damage in a few turns to limit the number of big attacks from Death’s Shadow. Some games Death’s Shadow will take advantage of the small damage you are dealing them and stop the last lethal burn spell with a timely Stubborn Denial or two. Don’t play into their lifeloss plan at their pace.


Sideboard Options


Affinity

Affinity is an aggressive deck looking to win the game via the combat step. Most of their cards are not very impressive on their own, but synergize very well. You will be taking advantage of that in your quest to beat them.

The deck is composed of bad cards and payoff cards, with the payoff cards being: Cranial Plating, Arcbound Ravager, Steel Overseer, Master of Etherium and to some extent Etched Champion and Signal Pest. If you manage to deal with these, you will win the game most of the time. Don’t Spell Snare a Vault Skirge, don’t Fatal Push a Memnite, and don’t Thoughtseize a Galvanic Blast.

Arcbound Ravager is a very complicated card to play against. Just like the Affinity player, you have to do exact math and be aware of each and every modular option at their disposal. I like killing the Ravager early to make them make a decision about additional +1/+1 counters, and some people like having the removal spell at the ready when your opponent goes all in. Find your style and stick to it.

The eight creature lands of the deck represent a very effective angle of attack, so always pay close attention to which Nexus they are sitting on. You can die from poison out of nowhere from either Ravager’s modular or the double black costed activated ability on Cranial Plating, and the Blinkmoth Nexus can pump even Inkmoth.

Keep an eye out for Blood Moon out of their sideboard if you happen to play a deck that is weak to it.


Sideboard Options


Burn

A very linear deck with one simple goal: reduce your opponent’s life total to 0 as fast as possible using hasty creatures and direct burn spells. While dedicated lifegain, Kitchen Finks and Lightning Helix for instance, is great for obvious reasons, let us talk about other ways to get an edge in the matchup.

First of all, your mana base is super important. Some decks can afford to run a lot of basics and fastlands (Spirebluff Canal and its’ friends), and this is a great start to beating Burn – actually forcing them to do the full twenty damage to you. You need to watch out though, because sometimes fetching a basic instead of shockland will cost you tempo and there for indirectly life in the long run. That brings me to the next point.

You need to establish a clock against Burn and not give them too many draw steps to find enough gas to finish you off. Delve creatures, Tarmogoyf, Master of Etherium, Thought-Knot Seer and Reality Smasher are all great at pressuring their life total at a fast pace.

Because Burn needs a critical mass of relevant cards, one-for-one answers are good against it. Spell Snare‘ing an Eidolon of the Great Revel, Fatal Push‘ing a Goblin Guide or Inquisition of Kozilek‘ing away a Boros Charm are all great plays that improve your odds of beating it. The more you trade spells one for one with the deck, the more firmly you put your self in the driver seat.

Sideboard Options

Please share all the inside information you have about the above decks. Sharing knowledge is power! Thank you all for reading, and I’ll see you next time where I cover three more decks you can be sure to face in your next Modern event!

If you want more Modern action, tune in to my twitch channel and follow me on twitter!

Counterspell in Modern

Let’s start off with a quote from a previous article of mine to underline that I am a man of my word.

It is definitely no secret that I enjoy playing Control decks, but it is also no secret that I have never actually pulled the trigger in a premier event before. After a long period of TitanShift as my weapon of choice, I decided it was time to try out interacting with my opponent again. I entered a 295 players Modern PTQ on Magic Online and fought my way to a 6-1 record having two win and in matches for a top 8 spot. Unfortunately the wheels fell off in the end, but I still have a good feeling about this deck.

The Butterfly Effect
The starting point was realizing I wanted to play the full four Logic Knot and that I needed a playset of Thought Scour to make that happen. Having played a bunch of Esper Shadow and my love for the card Lingering Souls in mind, adding those in were a no-brainer. Let us have a look at the deck card for card.

These cheap blue cantrips are necessary for a strategy like this. Serum Visions lets you keep more opening hands, keeps the engine running and finds more gas in the lategame.

Thought Scour enables Logic Knot and combos with Lingering Souls and Snapcaster Mage. Playing eight cantrips also enables you to play one or two fewer lands than you otherwise would have.

Not much to say here. Snapcaster Mage is incredible with one mana spells, and in the late game you have plenty of expensive spells to seal the deal with.

This card will do wonders vs. a bunch of different decks. Affinity has trouble dealing with a swarm of opposing fliers, Liliana of the Veil looks embarrasing and having four chump blockers against Death’s Shadow will buy you the time you need to find an answer. This little flashback card is a resilient threat against Midrange and Control decks, but it’s week to Combo decks.

This card is usually somewhere between blank and insanely clutch, so it’s not my favorite in the list. However, having a flexible answer to gamebreaking two-drops like Goblin Electromancer, Cranial Plating and Snapcaster Mage in your arsenal is very important. Also just countering a ramp spell out of TitanShift or any creature out of Abzan Company has value.

It is so satisfying to see actual catch all counterspells on this list. In a format as diverse as Modern, it can’t be overstated. Logic Knot should be Counterspell 90% of the time, and Cryptic Command will put you over the top if you survive into the lategame. Getting to apply flying combat damage with Lingering Souls while tapping down your opponent’s creatures a few turns is a very normal way to end a game with this deck.

I decided I wanted six one-mana removal spells and I chose a split between Fatal Push and Path to Exile. Fatal Push is best on the first few turns, while the drawback of Path to Exile decreases as the game goes on and also gives you valuable answers to threats like Reality Smasher, Voice of Resurgence, Kitchen Finks, delve creatures and Wurmcoil Engine.

Oh boy, I am not sure I can contain my self talking about this card. What if you could play one card that improved Burn, Abzan Company, Control and Combo matchups? The versatility of Collective Brutality is off the charts, and I am super happy that I have four of them in my 75.

I went with the white creature land because of some double white costed cards in my sideboard. For the record, I think Creeping Tar Pit is a better card, mostly because of its activation cost and the presence of Fatal Push in the first game of a match, but color requirements beats slightly better stats.

Sideboard
I really like white as a sideboard colour partly thanks to this card. It does work against Affinity, Ad Nauseam and Tron strategies. Cross over sideboard cards are key in Modern.

I talk about the versatility of Runed Halo in my “Hidden Gems in Modern” here.

Cheap counter magic will help you win the inevitable counter war in blue matchups, answer burn spells effectively in combination with Snapcaster Mage, say “no” to your opponents’ Collected Company and do work vs. the spell based Combo decks, Storm and Ad Nauseam.

This deck is very slow, and closing out a game vs. Combo can be a serious concern. Adding a disruptive clock for these matchups is tailor made. Vendilion Clique is playable against any deck, so it’s an easy swap if you have dead cards in unorthodox matchups.

 More versatile disruption for Control and Combo matchups when your removal spells are less than ideal. With a configuration of 4 Logic Knot, 4 Cryptic Command, 2 Spell Snare, 2 Dispel, 4 Collective Brutality, 3 Esper Charm, 2 Thoughtseize plus Snapcaster Mages to replay any of these, all Combo matchups are very good after sideboard.

The sweeper effect of this card is great vs. every aggro deck out there, and the uncounterable clause will improve Merfolk and Death’s Shadow drastically. Forcing your opponent to play the guessing game is super strong. Do you rely on spot removal and Snapcaster Mage only, or do we run Supreme Verdict? Supreme Verdict is a blowout waiting to happen.

Esper Control by Andreas Petersen

Creatures (4)
Snapcaster Mage

Spells (33)
Serum Visions
Thought Scour
Esper Charm
Cryptic Command
Logic Knot
Spell Snare
Collective Brutality
Lingering Souls
Fatal Push
Path to Exile
Lands (23)
Polluted Delta
Flooded Strand
Marsh Flats
Hallowed Fountain
Godless Shrine
Watery Grave
Island
Swamp
Plains
Celestial Colonnade
Drowned Catacombs
Glacial Fortress

Sideboard (15)
Stony Silence
Vendilion Clique
Dispel
Collective Brutality
Runed Halo
Thoughtseize
Supreme Verdict

Quick Notes on Popular Matchups

Grixis Shadow
In a matchup like this, they will try and grind you out and plan for a longer game. The bad news for them is that we’re very well equipped for such a battle, and thus this is a favorable matchup for Esper Control. Remember to keep a land in hand for a lategame Kolaghan’s Command.

TitanShift
The trick here is to actually close out the game once you have disrupted your opponent. Your interaction stack quite well together, and a lot of games will snowball out of control once you start answering their ramp spells with either counterspells or discard spells, with Esper Charm putting them in an awkward spot. You have eight hard counters and Snapcaster Mage to beat their top decks once they are hellbent. You are slightly below 50% for game one, but after sideboard you are very favoured.

Storm
The games are super complicated, and experience and courage will take you a long way. All of your cards are live, so if you play your disruption correctly, you should be ahead as long as you manage to put them on a clock. Turn two Ambush Viper is not embarrasing. Watch out for Blood Moon and Empty the Warrens in the sideboarded games.

Burn
Minimize the creature damage they start out the game with, establish a clock and close out the game with hard counters. Collective Brutality is your get-out-of-jail card and will win you the game if cast in multiples. I managed to resolve four in the PTQ, and it wasn’t pretty.

Affinity
Lingering Souls and Cryptic Command is your winning ingredients once you handle their initial assault. You get to cut some clunky cards and add game winning haymakers for games two and three.

BG/x Midrange
Esper Charm, Cryptic Command and Lingering Souls are bad news for this Liliana of the Veil-fueled archetype. The match will be a grind, and you will come out on top most of the time. On the one hand, you can easily afford to take some hits from a Tarmogoyf, but Dark Confidant needs to hit the bin on the spot.

U/W Control
You have the upper hand because Lingering Souls and Logic Knot line up well against their planeswalkers, and Esper Charm is a lot easier to cast and resolve than Sphinx’s Revelation. The black discard spells give you another dimension of disruption that they don’t have, and you should be able to ignore their mana disruption most games.

Dredge
This matchup is unwinnable, and on purpose I decided to not include any hate cards in the sideboard. Playing Control in Modern, you have to be able to make these choices and accept a loss to a certain deck.

Abzan/Bant Company
You want to try and hinder their mana development early on and counter Collected Company at any cost. Note that Collective Brutality can both kill a creature and snag a copy of Collected Company or Chord of Calling from their hand on turn two before they get the chance to play either. Dispel and Supreme Verdict out of the sideboard solidify this as a positive matchup.

Black/White Eldrazi Taxes
Unless you get caught by Leonin Arbiter and Ghost Quarter, you have a very good time playing against this deck. Their clock is not super scary, so you have time to grind them down with Esper Charm, Cryptic Command and Snapcaster Mage. In the tournament I beat my opponent that went turn two Thought-Knot Seer, turn three Thought-Knot Seer without breaking a sweat.

Eldrazi Tron
The difficult thing about a matchup like this is that they have very diverse threats, which is never a good thing for control decks. Sometimes your disruption will line up perfectly with their threats, and sometimes you look silly with your Fatal Push against their double Reality Smasher. Stony Silence is also hit or miss, so expect a lot of variance in your games.

Make sure to follow Andreas Petersen on his twitch channel and on twitter!

Vintage is Coming! Season 2.

Last time, I shared my thoughts about the restrictions of Monastery Mentor and Thorn of Amethyst and listed a few decks that I expect to break out as a result. Today I’ll address the unrestriction of Yawgmoth’s Bargain and list a few more decks you can expect to play, or consider playing your self, in the new environment!

Having played Vintage for 14 years, I have definitely resolved and faced my share of Yawgmoth’s Bargain. At a healthy life total, you can expect to win the game on the spot, especially since we now have Mox Opal to start your black mana chain should you already have made your land drop in addition to Mox Jet, Black Lotus and Lotus Petal, so this card obviously has potential. It does come with a few downsides.

You need Dark Ritual to power out Yawgmoth’s Bargain, and Dark Ritual gets hit by Mental Misstep – a card that will increase its impact on the format after MUD and Eldrazi got weakened and killed respectively by the restriction of Thorn of Amethyst. Furthermore, it could be very difficult to support Dark Ritual and Mox Opal in the same deck.

The second problem is the lifetotal aspect of it. In different formats, a strength of Storm decks has always been its ability to win the game the turn before you lose the game in the hands of opposing creatures. In Legacy and Modern you win with Past in Flames in these situations. I imagine this Storm deck will also feature tutors and Yawgmoth’s Will for a similar effect, but my gut feeling tells me that a diverse threat base of Mind’s Desire, Timetwister, Wheel of Fortune, Necropotence, singleton Yawgmoth’s Bargain and Dark Petition in addition to the restricted tutors is a better way to go than maxing out on Bargains.

The third issue is the straight up comparison to Paradoxical Outcome. It costs less mana, it doesn’t care about your life total, and it makes it easier for your deck to support Force of Will. It should be fairly obvious that Paradoxical Outcome-based decks are the new sheriff in town, and this could cause an uptick in Null Rod and Stony Silence. Should this happen, then relying on Dark Ritual and Cabal Ritual could be the way to go in Storm decks, and multiple Yawgmoth’s Bargains could become interesting. For now, I’m sticking to Paradoxical Outcome as my engine. If I was a betting man, this card would be at the top of my list of cards that should be on Wizards’ radar.


More New/Old Decks

Oath of Druids is in a strange spot. The biggest perk of playing this strategy before was preying on MUD decks, which will go down in the metagame percentages without a doubt after Thorn of Amethyst was restricted. It was also quite ambitious to justify playing Oath as long as quadruple Monastery Mentor was allowed, but that has changed now. The power of getting to summon a turn two Griselbrand or Emrakul, the Aeon’s Torn can’t be ignored, so people will look into different controlling builds of Oath in the weeks to come. The deck can splash black for tutors and Abrupt Decay or red for Pyroblast and Ancient Grudge if the metagame calls for it – or both because of Forbidden Orchard. While the land will sometimes give your opponent a relevant clock when you don’t draw an Oath, Forbidden Orchard is also a rainbow land that enables playing four colors.
For those of you who would be interesting in combining the speed of Oath of Druids with the power of Paradoxical Outcome, check out this deck that piloted to a top 4 finish a few weeks ago in the Vintage Challenge.

This card has definately seen play these past few months, but only as a win condition in Paradoxical Outcome-fueled decks. I think we will see classic Grixis Control decks pop up with this little combo as a finisher next to TinkerBlightsteel Colossus. Getting to run all the good cards in Magic and splash Pyroblast and Dack Fayden should be every Magic player’s dream. Time Vault + Voltaic Key is a powerful win condition because it can trump any boardstate from your opponent. You can go different routes within the Grixis shard with Goblin Welder/Thirst for Knowledge package, a Thoughtcast/Tezzeret well-oiled machine or the more streamlined way of life with “just good, restricted cards“. Being able to either control a long game or steal a quick one is a very good attribute in Vintage, and I believe we will see the power of Time Vault soon enough. If Oath and Time Vault both become major players in the metagame, Abrupt Decay looks deliciously well positioned.

Another archetype that has been horribly underpowered compared to Mentor is Blue/Red Delver. You have all the restricted blue cards at your disposal, you have the ability to pressure your opponent starting from turn one, and your support color is the best sideboard color in the format. Because of your low curve, you can use Wasteland and Strip Mine in combination with Null Rod to level the playing field vs. the heavy hitters of the format that need more mana to function.

A threat base of Delver of Secrets, Harsh Mentor or Young Pyromancer depending on your style and Snapcaster Mages combined with Lightning Bolt can put the game out of reach quickly with little to no time for the opponent to recover. You also have a solid amount of stack control with 4 Force of Will, 4 Mental Misstep and a few more cheap counterspells like Spell Pierce, Flusterstorm or Pyroblast, so you’re well setup vs. the unfair strategies in the format.

Once the format gets under way and I have access to more data from the Magic Online Leagues, I will go in depth with different decks and let you know about it. Until then, follow me on Twitter or on my Twitch channel and watch me take on the format later this week!

Vintage is Coming!

This Monday the Vintage format was hit by two more restrictions following the dominance of Monastery Mentor-powered blue decks and Mishra’s Workshop-based aggressive prison decks for quite some time. While it simply can’t be argued that these two archetypes needed to be cooled down, I want to talk about my solution for it and what I think about Vintage moving forward with the introductions of Leagues on Magic Online and these restrictions in mind. Let’s go!

First things first. If you google search for “ecobaronen mtgo”, you will see that I have a lot of good finishes with various versions of Mentor decks in Vintage. I’m not mentioning this to show off, but simply to underline that I’m not biased in this statement:

Monastery Mentor was the best victory condition for blue decks – NOT close – and it made all other blue decks simply a worse choice and therefor killed diversity little by little. Wizards made the mistake of chopping off its arms (Gitaxian Probe and Gush) once, but now finally went for the head. For these reasons it had to go.

Later in the article I will touch on which decks and cards are suddently playable again as a reaction to this restriction.

Wizards’ own statistics showed that four Thorn of Amethyst were played in 40% of all top 8 decks in the Vintage Challenges over the last year, and of course action should be taken towards this deck.

The only problem I have with this is, while you managed to make MUD worse, you also managed to kill White Eldrazi for no reason at all.

Here’s my White Eldrazi deck I played this spring in a proxy tournament and went 7-2 on the day (4-2 in the main event finishing 9th, then 3-0’ing a side event):

White Eldrazi by Andreas Petersen

Creatures (25)
Thalia, Guardian of Thraben
Containment Priest
Phyrexian Revoker
Eldrazi Displacer
Thought-Knot Seer
Reality Smasher
Lodestone Golem

Spells (12)
Thorn of Amethyst
Chalice of the Void
Black Lotus
Mana Crypt
Mox Emerald
Mox Pearl
Mox Ruby
Mox Jet
Mox Sapphire
Lands (23)
Wasteland
Strip Mine
Cavern of Souls
Eldrazi Temple
Ancient Tomb
Plains
Karakas

In a creature-based deck like Eldrazi, Thorn of Amethyst and Thalia, Guardian of Thraben are your eight cards that disrupt your opponent and not your self. While MUD is also very creature heavy, as Wizards stated in their article, you have the difference in 4 Mishra’s Workshop and Foundry Inspector to get mana advantage. With a playset of this old land, Sphere of Resistance and Thorn of Amethyst are so close to the same power level in MUD, while they are completely different in the Eldrazi list and the difference between a top 5 deck and an unplayable one unfortunately. Because I love diversity not only in the blue decks, but also in the disrupting and taxing archetypes, I feel like restricting Thorn instead of Sphere was a mistake.

A Look Ahead

With new restrictions and Competitive Leagues coming to Magic Online, the future looks bright for Vintage. While I can’t provide thoroughly thought out deck lists before we have an established metagame, I can give my best predictions about what to expect and what you should look into in the format now.

BUG is back! I expect Black/Blue/Green decks with Deathrite Shaman and Leovold to become a serious player now. These colors give access to the restricted blue and black cards, a one mana planeswalker, Abrupt Decay for Time Vault and Oath of Druids and a very powerful hatebear in Leovold. Leovold stops Paradoxical Outcome and prevents your opponent from chaining draw spells and cantrips.

I like the fact that this deck can afford to play Null Rod because of Deathrite Shaman for acceleration and will expect it to run a singleton Crucible of Worlds or Ramunap Excavator, maybe with a small Green Sun’s Zenith package, to replay Wasteland or Strip Mine. BUG is a potent combination of card quality and disruption.

With a defined metagame, you can build your Blue/White Standstill deck and prey on a lot of decks at the same time. You want a lot of cheap answers in the form of Swords to Plowshares, Mental Misstep and one mana counterspells to make sure you can play your unrestricted Ancestral Recall on turn 2.

From there you are looking to snowball your advantage with Mana Drain and more of the same cheap interaction. If you’re lucky enough to be chaining Standstills, you’re doing it right! The deck will most likely play some Snapcaster Mages and Jace, the Mind Sculptor for flexibility and card advantage and finish the game off with Emrakul, the Promised End. Like the BUG deck, only the on-color Moxen will be included, so Stony Silence to combat Paradoxical Outcome and Time Vault is a main deck option. I will be testing Spell Queller out of the sideboard for when my opponent sideboards out their removal spells, so watch out!

It’s finally little brother’s time to shine! Like Neymar Jr. leaving to Paris to get some time in the spotlight instead of being in Messi’s shadows, Young Pyromancer is ready to take over after Mentor was sacked.

Being awarded free 1/1’s for playing Magic is still very powerful, and I expect Grixis and Jeskai versions (the latter can even play singleton Mentor) to pop up.
Black lets you play tutors and card draw like Night’s Whisper or Painful Truths, and white adds Swords to Plowshares, Monastery Mentor and better sideboard options. Young Pyromancer is a turn one play a higher percentage of the time than Mentor was, so be prepared to fight the war on the stack earlier.
With a Mox, a normal play pattern in blue mirrors will be turn two Young Pyromancer with Flusterstorm backup. I’m super excited that this style of deck is still viable in Vintage and not too good anymore.

Next time I’ll be writing about three more new (old) decks, the unrestriction of Yawgmoth’s Bargain and the state of combo in general. In the meantime follow me on Twitter and tune in to my Twitch Channel and look out for Vintage action in the future. As soon as the Leagues are in place, I will be spending a lot of time playing in them.

Thanks for reading!

Latest Modern Tech, August 2017

© 2017 photo credit: magic.wizards.com/en/events/coverage/

As some of you may be aware, this weekend had a tasty Modern Grand Prix double header with events in Sao Paulo, Brazil and Birmingham, England. That means a double amount of data to look at! Today I’ll be focusing on fresh new technology that may or may not become industry standard moving forward.

For reference, here are the 16 decks in the two top 8’s combined:

3 Grixis Shadow
3 B/G(x) Midrange
2 TitanShift
2 Bant Knightfall
2 Abzan Company
1 Jeskai Control
1 G/X Tron
1 Burn
1 Lantern Control

Full overview of all 16 decklists:

I’ve taken the freedom to put all black-green based Midrange decks in the same category as well as not taken the human subtheme of one of the Bant decks into account. Now let’s dig down to look at some of the sweet new tech these players brought to the tournament.

Danilo Ramos Mopesto‘s Grixis Shadow list has quite a few interesting things going on. He has a total of three(!) copies of Liliana of the Veil in his 75, which is not something we see every day. It has applications against a bunch of decks with the Mirror Match and various combo decks being the most obvious. While she is not the best card you can have against any deck, she will improve the highest amount of matchups. A very important feature in a gigantic format like Modern where you will almost always have dead cards in your main deck.

His sweeper of choice for his sideboard is this little gem. On the surface you’re looking at an instant speed Pyroclasm at the cost of one more mana, but there’s more than meets the eye to it. Kozilek’s Return being colorless means you can deal with pesky Etched Champions. The downside to this card vs. Anger of the Gods or Flaying Tendrils is definitely the uptick in Collected Company decks where exiling the creatures can be super important.

Joao Lelis not only won the Brazilian Grand Prix; he also played a long forgotten card in his sideboard as a three-of. Flashfreeze is a flexible counterspell that can deal with Collected Company, Chord of Calling, Anger of the Gods and Primeval Titan, and countering creatures is something Negate is incapable of.

Flashfreeze competes with Unified Will for this slot, but it looks like he found it more important to have an answer to opposing copies of Collected Company and Chord of Calling in the pseudo mirror – where Unified Will isn’t reliable – than having the more flexible counterspell in other matchups.


The jury is still out on whether Hour of Promise is an upgrade to TitanShift or those precious slots are better used on various interaction depending on the metagame. Vitor Grassato decided it was a good weekend for a super threat dense list and played three copies of Hour of Promise on top of 4 Scapeshift, 4 Primeval Titan and 2 Summoner’s Pact.

This setup is very good at overloading various control and Midrange strategies, but can struggle against fast decks like Death’s Shadow and Burn. His sideboard tries to make up for that with a bunch of different tools to fight aggressive strategies. Also note the three Prismatic Omen in his main deck. I don’t like drawing copy number two, but the first one drawn is obviously very potent in combination with Hour of Promise. I like two copies in a list like this.

While these cards are format staples in other decks for obvious reasons, the inclusion of black in oldfashioned Tron is just what the doctor ordered (or what the metagame forces you do to if you want to be competitive, I suppose). Having a playset of Collective Brutality helps out against bad matchups like Burn and Storm while the Fatal Push are great at buying time vs. Death’s Shadow in particular. Even though the black splash is seen before, I wanted to talk about it since regular Tron has fallen out of favor recently. This great finish by Rafael Costa Zaghi could mount a comeback for Tron in the metagame percentages.

I’ve spent a lot of time talking about how Modern needs better reactive spells, and that actual Counterspell would improve the format quite a bit. Jean Sato took matter into his own hands and played three Logic Knot in his Jeskai Control deck.

While not being actual Counterspell, Logic Knot does a good impression while dealing with everything from Thought-Knot Seer, Primeval Titan and Ad Nauseam to Gifts Ungiven, Karn Liberated and the last lethal Burn spell. The importance of having a catch-all like Logic Knot can’t be overstated, and I’m very curious to explore my options going forward.

I will be looking at Thought Scour to make sure I can play the full playset of Logic Knot. Who would’ve thought that a classic effect like Counterspell would be of so much value in the 2017 Modern landscape.

This is just an improved Viridian Shaman on paper, but I wanted to credit Ivan de Castro Sanchez for finding it. I doubt this card has made a lot of Grand Prix top 8’s before. It fits perfectly in his human-themed Collected Company deck with its creature type and converted manacost and will do the job against Affinity.

While Sin Collector has seen play on and off in Abzan Company all the way back to the days of Birthing Pod, playing more than one is very rare. Oscar Christensen chose to run three copies and zero Thoughtseize in his sideboard to combat pesky instants and sorceries for games two and three. He can hit them off Collected Company, they have a 2/1 body attached for value, and both the stats and not costing life vs. Burn is relevant. If the combo decks become faster in the future, you can always go back to Thoughtseize again.

This card was pretty good back in Standard, but was quickly relegated to only seeing play in Vintage Cube Draft. Loïc Le Briand had different plans for it and replaced his Eidolon of the Great Revel with this smoking hot artifact! My guess is that he found the Eidolon subpar when being on the draw and even on the play in too many matchups and wanted to find a replacement. Mirror Match, fast Affinity draws, delve creatures and Eldrazi Tron are just a few of the bad situations you can encounter with Eidolon in your deck these days. While the Shrine is a bad top deck in the lategame, casting it on turn two can be very backbreaking for a lot of decks – kind of like Eidolon used to be. I imagine resolving this on turn two vs. Death’s Shadow will not end happily for the non-Burn player, as long as you keep an eye out for Kolaghan’s Command.

Simon Nielsen and his testing group went deep in the tank on this one. The TitanShift deck has steadily grown in popularity and the need for an edge in the mirror has also increased. Crumble to Dust used to be the go-to in these metagame situations, also offering some much needed disruption vs. Tron, but when the TitanShift doesn’t draw – or can afford to sandbag his Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle Crumble to Dust can be very lackluster. Witchbane Orb will most like catch your opponent off guard and relegate them to a fair deck trying to win via the attack step only. This a huge advantage in the mirror match, and you can usually win the game with a Scapeshift or a lot of Valakut triggers thanks to Primeval Titan. Furthermore, it also improves the bad Storm matchup and can give valuable percentages vs. Burn.

I chose only to focus on the two top 8’s, but I’m sure much more sweet technology is hidden if you go deep on the 16 or 32 best finishing decklists from these events.

What’s your favorite tech from the weekend? Let me know in the comments!

Make sure to follow Andreas Petersen on his twitch channel and on twitter!

Hidden Gems in Modern

Today I want to talk about some cards that see too little play in my opinion. Sometimes people are very rigid in their deckbuilding and are too afraid to innovate. Or maybe they need to see a certain card make four or five top 8’s before they try it out them selves. Tons of things factor in when it comes to deckbuilding, and Magic players are usually on the safe side of things. So losen up the tight belt, ride along and live a little – at least with me in this article!

Can be played in: Blue/White Control, Blue Moon, Ad Nauseam

I played Standard back when Force Spike was legal and enjoy the threat of Daze in Legacy. Do you play your best threat every turn to optimize your potential or do you respect the Force Spike effect? A lot of interesting gameplay comes up with a card like this in the format.

It’s a normal strategy to sideboard out Daze on the draw in Legacy, but the opponent will always have to respect it to some degree. In Legacy you can pitch Daze to Force of Will or Brainstorm it back with a fetchland, while the Force Spike sometimes didn’t have a use besides being cast in early 2000’s Standard.

The point I’m getting at is that Censor has cycling for the cheap cost of one blue mana, so if you can’t counter your opponents threat on curve, you can easily cash it in for another card. Countering opposing turn two plays on the play and turn 3 plays on the draw is likely the most frequent use of Censor. Liliana of the Veil, Thought-Knot Seer and Karn Liberated come to mind, but even something like four-mana planeswalkers, Primeval Titan and Gifts Ungiven are realistic targets. And if they have mana to spare, just draw your card and move on.

It would likely replace Mana Leak – a card that is useful to cast in more scenarios, but also lose value in long games or against weary opponents. In Ad Nauseam Censor will act as a cantrip that maybe 20% of the time is able to counter something from the opponent. Liliana of the Veil and Thought-Knot Seer are your best targets, but Collected Company and Chord of Calling are pretty nice to prevent from happening in that matchup. It also gives you the ability to beat Abrupt Decay with your Laboratory Maniac kill, as you can cycle in response.

Can be played in: Bant Eldrazi, Eldrazi Tron, Blue Tron

The die roll is really important in Modern and Magic in general, and a bunch of games will be determined by it throughout any given tournament. Did I get to suspend my Ancestral Vision before my opponent snatched it with an Inquisition of Kozilek?

Did I get to play my Anger of the Gods before my opponent untapped with Steel Overseer?

Did I play first and won the TitanShift mirror because I was one turn faster? I’m sure you get the picture. With Gemstone Caverns in your deck (you should play 1-2 copies if you play it), you’re basically trying to flip the script whenever you’re on the draw. With you drawing an extra card for the turn opposed to your opponent who actually won the die roll, you have more resources to work with and the exile clause is less damaging. From here you can go turn one Chalice of the Void, turn two Thought-Knot Seer if you have an Eldrazi Temple or hold up Remand turn before depending on which of the decks you’re playing.

The reason why I only included decks with a lot of colorless cards in them is that the flipside of Gemstone Caverns is if you actually win the dieroll (or draw into it on a later turn), then the land must be acceptable to draw. I’m always excited when I win the die roll vs. these decks, but if they all of a sudden have a Gemstone Caverns, I’m back to being nervous again.

Can be played in: Blue/White Control

This card has definitely seen the most play out of the three, but I feel it should be seeing way more play right now. The double white cost limits it to only a few decks with Blue/White Control being the only true tier 1 deck, so I’ll focus on that today. In a deck also playing Cryptic Command, it’s very important that your manabase can support both double white and triple blue.

The easy fix is Mystic Gate which lets you filter both ways. Mystic Gate is not very good with a lot of combined copies of Tectonic Edge and Ghost Quarter, however, so you shouldn’t play more than four colorless lands if you include two Mystic Gate. Now that we established the means to play Runed Halo, let’s dive into its utility in the format. I like Runed Halo out of the sideboard, but depending on your number of available slots between the main deck and sideboard, I could also see my self playing a copy or two in my starting 60.

It’s particularly good against decks with a low number of threats on the table like Death’s Shadow, Bogles and Eldrazi variants. Ironically, these are also the decks that have a difficult time getting rid of the enchantment. Eidolon of the Great Revel vs. Burn, Walking Ballista vs. Eldrazi Tron, Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle vs. TitanShift and Conflagrate vs. Dredge are other strong cards to name.

Remember, the default mode on this card is naming a creature on your opponents side of the board, and not only do you shut down that creature, but you also shut down all future copies of that card that your opponent draws. Of course it will be lackluster vs. various Collected Company decks, Affinity and Control matchups, but its overall utility warrants at least a few sideboard slots in my book.

I actually like this topic a lot, so I would be interested in hearing your candidates for “hidden gems” in Modern! Let me know in the comments 🙂

Make sure to follow Andreas Petersen on Twitter and his Twitch channel!

Meet the Pros: Johannes Gutbrod, Legacy

© 2017 photo credit: magiccardmarket.eu

Editorial Note: Read more about Gutbrod’s performance at MKMSeries Prague – It’s a miracle: Back-to-Back Victory

Hello Johannes and congratulations for taking down the Legacy portion of the Magic Card Market Series this weekend! Thank you for stopping by today. Please give the readers a quick introduction of yourself as a Magic player.

Hello guys, thanks for having me 🙂
I’m a 25 year old student and Legacy enthusiast from Nürnberg (Germany). I only play this format, as I enjoy it the most. I organize Legacy tournaments, playtest a lot with friends and try to play all the big European tournaments.

I like to learn new interactions in this format and I’m a person who analyses his own gameplay and tries to find mistakes in there in order to get better and to develop my skill further.

I know you played a fair share of Miracles in the past, and at this event you brought a new version of the deck. Talk a little about the card choices. Monastery Mentor + Daze package opposed to going harder on the Snapcaster Mage + Predict engine with multiple copies of Unexpectedly Absent.

First of all this version can win games much faster than its controllish cousin. Monastery Mentor and Daze can swing games in two or three turns. But that’s rarely the case.

What I like about this version is that it can switch roles so effectively. Often it’s correct to keep a Daze, even when it seems counterintuitive to protect a crucial spell later on when your opponent will never expect it, or taps out. Daze is a safety net for many problematic cards in the format as well (Show and Tell, True-Name Nemesis, Planeswalkers…).

I’m curious about the strengths and weaknesses of the deck. Obviously the Miracles plan has become less consistent after Sensei’s Divining Top got banned, so the deck has lost some overall powerlevel. How does your version make up for that?

I don’t even think that the deck lost as much powerlevel as most people think. Counterbalance was weak in a lot of matchups and with more Predicts and Mentors previously harder matchups like Eldrazi got way better.

Moreover the bluecount is higher than before. And Portent, although being weaker than Sensei’s Divining Top, is another shuffle effect (important e.g. under Blood Moon) and enables locking out the opponent in topdeck mode.

But I think the deck got even harder to play than before… so to anyone picking this deck: You have to practice a lot and try to overthink your gameplay in order to become better!

I heard you lost round 1 of this tournament, but you still managed to come out on top. Take us through your mindset as the rounds went by and you kept racking up wins.

Honestly speaking, in the minutes after the loss I was quite tilted, as I expected much more from myself. So I went out to grasp some fresh air and tried to refocus, thinking that if I will lose no one would care but if I will make it to the top it would truly be a miracle.

I try to think of these situations as learning experiences not just regarding legacy but regarding life as a whole. As I was coming closer and closer to my goal I became more focused and concentrated, trying to block out my surroundings and just think about the next turn(s).

What is your opinion about the health of Legacy right now? On the surface it seems very balanced and like you can play a lot of different decks without being horribly behind like in the Top era.

I agree 100% with your statement. I’ve never thought that you could play that many different decks competitively without one dominating the others. I love to see new decks popping up, be it Marcus Ewaldhs Blue Moon deck, or Tomas Vlceks NicFit.

Legacy was announced as 1/3 of the formats for an upcoming Pro Tour next season. In my opinion, it’s a brilliant move by Wizards of the Coast to motivate Legacy specialists to try and qualify to try their skills versus the absolute elite. What’s your take on this in general and on a personal level?

In general I like the renowned interest in the best magic format. Many people will have a look into this format which they might have never tried before. This will help the community as more tournaments would get organized/ articles get written and so on.

For me personally it is a long wished but very high goal to play Legacy at the ProTour. Although qualifying seems to be really hard and I’m not looking forward to playing Standard to do so, haha. On the other hand I can’t wait to play at GP Birmingham!

Thanks a lot for your time. Hope to see you outplaying platinum pros on the biggest stage next year! In meantime, feel free to follow me on twitter and on my twitch channel. See you there! 🙂