Meet the Pros: Andrea Mengucci

Hello Andrea and thank you for taking your time with me today! With the Pro Tour coming up, a lot of attention is on Standard. Looking at Standard from the outside these past few years has not been a pretty sight. What is the state of Standard right now in your opinion?

Standard is in a good place right now. It has quite few tier 1 decks, and they represent all the strategies of Magic:

  • Aggro: Mono Red
  • Midrange: Temur
  • Control: Blue/Black Control, Blue/White Approach
  • Combo: Gift

Those are all good decks that can be qualified as tier 1, so the format is definitely healthy. It isn’t Modern or Legacy where you have tons of different decks, but it has never been in the history of Standard. So I feel like this Standard is good and it is what it should always be.

A few months ago Wizards of the Coast announced Modern’s return to the Pro Tour in 2018. What was your first reaction to this?

I’m a little bit biased about the Modern Pro Tour because I hate Modern. It’s my least favorite format and I never play it – in fact last time I played it was World Magic Cup 2016. So I’m pretty sad about it and won’t test a lot of Constructed for the event, since the format is super stagnant and you can play any deck and go 10-0 or 0-10. But I can easily see Modern lovers standing up and shouting at me now, and I’ll be fine with that.

Everyone who follows you on social media and appreciates the great job you’re doing at ChannelFireball knows your passion for Legacy. Now all of a sudden you get to play your favorite format on the Pro Tour in 2018. Tell us why Legacy means so much to you.

I’m obviously very happy to show my Italian black bordered dual lands at the Pro Tour stage! But I don’t want this to be a thing that happens every Pro Tour or even once a year. The Pro Tour is good for innovations. You get an edge by inventing new decks in Standard and having a better strategy in Draft, but with stagnant formats like Modern and Legacy this goes away and that skill is less rewarded.

It seems like team tournaments will be a higher focus in competitive Magic moving forward. To me it is natural because you usually test as a group and root for your friends anyway. Do you feel the same way or would you rather play on your own all the time?

I really dislike where Grand Prix are going. I dislike that you have to be in a team of people to go to Grand Prix nowadays. What if you are good, but live in a environment where there are only bad players? You can just never spike.

For me Magic is an individual game, not soccer or basketball. It’s designed to be played 1 vs 1. It’s okay if sometimes you play 3 vs 3 because it’s more fun, but I feel like the 2018 Grand Prix schedule has way too many Team Grand Prix that punishes those who want to break through.

Lastly I want to hear about your personal expectations for the season. I know you’re representing Italy at the World Magic Cup. When we talk again at the end at the season, which accomplishments do you hope to tell me about?

I hope we’ll do well at Pro Tour Albuquerque, though it’ll be hard since Standard and Draft are already solved so variance will be huge once again and same for the World Magic Cup. I also have four Grand Prix coming up, so I hope to get my first top 8 in one of those, since it’s getting pretty late and I still haven’t achieved that goal in my Magic career.

To wrap up this interview, feel free to share your Twitter, thank your mom or give a shout out to sponsors. Thank you again for this interview!

Thanks for reading. You can follow me on Channel Fireball where I make two videos per week (Legacy and Vintage) and where I write one article per week (generic topic).

Also if you want to have daily tweets about Magic follow me on Twitter.

Introducing: Thomas Enevoldsen

Hello and welcome to Team Snapcardster! Could you give a quick introduction of your self?

My name is Thomas Enevoldsen, I’m 29 years old and I work full time as an attorney in Denmark. I started playing Magic in 2003 (during Mirrodin) and tournament Magic in 2004 (Champions of Kamigawa prerelease!). My first deck was a Green/Red Beast tribal deck and my last deck was a Blue/Black control deck from Danish Nationals last weekend. So I have evolved somewhat over the past 14 years.


For the people (shame on them!) who might not be too familiar with your previous accomplishments, can you highlight a few of them?

1st at World Magic Cup 2014
1st at Grand Prix Strasbourg (Legacy)
Top 4 at Grand Prix Prague (Legacy)
1st at Danish Nationals 2009
1st at Danish Nationals 2013

We have all played Magic for quite some time, and we all have different reasons to do so. What keeps your engine running after all these years?

The bigger perspective is self-realization and an ever-growing desire not to lose. On a smaller scale, what I love the most about tournament Magic is the experience of playing against opponents who care just as much about winning as you do. Everybody plays to win. To squeeze as much as possible out of every little resource the game has to offer. This mentality is not easy to find in other situations in life. People generally live recreationally – like they are playing kitchen table Magic. You don’t necessarily need to give a 100 % at work or studies, relationships even, and you’ll probably still be fine. But in Magic, if you leave an inch on the table, someone else is going to pick it up. And I love the fight for that inch.

What is your favorite format and why?

I can’t really decide. I used to believe it was legacy, since that is where most of my good results come from. From a strict game perspective, I love sealed the most, since it is essentially two games in one (building and playing), and both rewards creativity more so than other formats where most games are decided by the power of the cards and the order they were drawn in. From a fun perspective, nothing really beats team drafting, both for the team spirit on your team and the bragging rights against your opponents. There is always so much more on the line in team draft, because your pride is at stake!

Looking into the crystal ball, what does the next 12 months have in store for you MTG-wise?

Attend as many European Grand Prix as possible, play the odd Magic Online qualifiers and generally just aim to get on the Pro Tour again. Whatever format, whatever city. Just get back.

Thank you so much for taking your time. Feel free to leave your Twitter handle, so people can keep up with your magical endeavours in the future!

No problem!

Follow Thomas Enevoldsen on

Twitter: @therealenevolds

Introducing: Michael Bonde

Hello and welcome to Team Snapcardster! Could you give a quick introduction of your self?

Hello there! My name is Michael Bonde, I live in Aarhus in Denmark and I am 30 years old. I am partly a Magic “pro” and finishing my education this year as a teacher in English, History and Sports.


For the people (shame on them!) who might not be too familiar with your previous accomplishments, can you highlight a few of them?

Of course I will. My resume is a bit across formats:

17th PT Shadows over Innistrad (lost win & in for top 8)

3-4th at Grand Prix Strasbourg (Legacy)

3-4th at Grand Prix Madrid (Limited)

5th at Grand Prix Sao Paulo (Team Limited)

10th at Grand Prix San Diego (Limited)

1st at Bazaar of Moxen 8 (Vintage)

1st at StarCityGames Worcester (Standard)


We have all played Magic for quite some time, and we all have different reasons to do so. What keeps your engine running after all these years?

I see the game as a giant puzzle. Every new format brings something different to the mix and draws on different information from the past.

This makes almost every game different in some degree, but still within the region that one can practice and master. I love dedicating myself towards a goal of trying to become the best, within my own style of play. Being able to follow this process and see results is really something unique – for me at least.

In the beginning it was the mastering of play by play, and even though this is still an evergreen focus, more and more layers add-on which makes it even more complicated and interesting.

What is your favorite format and why?

I’m always a bit torn when someone asks me this question, because the answer is I really just love magic! The formats I often play the most are Legacy, Draft and Sealed.

Legacy is a static format where you can build up a giant database of decks, plays, matchups and try to get perfect information due to many matchups and games play out alike and there is often a right or wrong thing to do. Drafting and doing sealed are on the other hand a bit more fluid. You get to solve the “format” and every game is completely different. You need to be aware of both drafting the correct deck, color pairs, card choices in each color and compared to picks already made. Furthermore it is insanely complex and a very fun topic to dig into and discuss with peers.

Looking into the crystal ball, what does the next 12 months have in store for you MTG-wise?

First of all I am in the Pro Players Club with Silver.

My plan is to qualify for 2-3 of the Pro Tours this season and as a minimum cross the threshold for being Silver again for next season.

This means that I will be playing more Magic Online Championship on Magic Online, play a fair amount of Grand Prix’s and try and do my best at the Pro Tour scene.

Nothing is given, but I will do my best to evolve as a player and have fun while doing it.

Thank you so much for taking your time. Feel free to leave your Twitter handle, so people can keep up with your magical endeavours in the future!

Follow Michael Bonde on

Twitter: @lampalot

Magic Online: lampalot

Twitch: MichaelBonde

Meet the Pros: Johannes Gutbrod, Legacy

© 2017 photo credit: magiccardmarket.eu

Editorial Note: Read more about Gutbrod’s performance at MKMSeries Prague – It’s a miracle: Back-to-Back Victory

Hello Johannes and congratulations for taking down the Legacy portion of the Magic Card Market Series this weekend! Thank you for stopping by today. Please give the readers a quick introduction of yourself as a Magic player.

Hello guys, thanks for having me 🙂
I’m a 25 year old student and Legacy enthusiast from Nürnberg (Germany). I only play this format, as I enjoy it the most. I organize Legacy tournaments, playtest a lot with friends and try to play all the big European tournaments.

I like to learn new interactions in this format and I’m a person who analyses his own gameplay and tries to find mistakes in there in order to get better and to develop my skill further.

I know you played a fair share of Miracles in the past, and at this event you brought a new version of the deck. Talk a little about the card choices. Monastery Mentor + Daze package opposed to going harder on the Snapcaster Mage + Predict engine with multiple copies of Unexpectedly Absent.

First of all this version can win games much faster than its controllish cousin. Monastery Mentor and Daze can swing games in two or three turns. But that’s rarely the case.

What I like about this version is that it can switch roles so effectively. Often it’s correct to keep a Daze, even when it seems counterintuitive to protect a crucial spell later on when your opponent will never expect it, or taps out. Daze is a safety net for many problematic cards in the format as well (Show and Tell, True-Name Nemesis, Planeswalkers…).

I’m curious about the strengths and weaknesses of the deck. Obviously the Miracles plan has become less consistent after Sensei’s Divining Top got banned, so the deck has lost some overall powerlevel. How does your version make up for that?

I don’t even think that the deck lost as much powerlevel as most people think. Counterbalance was weak in a lot of matchups and with more Predicts and Mentors previously harder matchups like Eldrazi got way better.

Moreover the bluecount is higher than before. And Portent, although being weaker than Sensei’s Divining Top, is another shuffle effect (important e.g. under Blood Moon) and enables locking out the opponent in topdeck mode.

But I think the deck got even harder to play than before… so to anyone picking this deck: You have to practice a lot and try to overthink your gameplay in order to become better!

I heard you lost round 1 of this tournament, but you still managed to come out on top. Take us through your mindset as the rounds went by and you kept racking up wins.

Honestly speaking, in the minutes after the loss I was quite tilted, as I expected much more from myself. So I went out to grasp some fresh air and tried to refocus, thinking that if I will lose no one would care but if I will make it to the top it would truly be a miracle.

I try to think of these situations as learning experiences not just regarding legacy but regarding life as a whole. As I was coming closer and closer to my goal I became more focused and concentrated, trying to block out my surroundings and just think about the next turn(s).

What is your opinion about the health of Legacy right now? On the surface it seems very balanced and like you can play a lot of different decks without being horribly behind like in the Top era.

I agree 100% with your statement. I’ve never thought that you could play that many different decks competitively without one dominating the others. I love to see new decks popping up, be it Marcus Ewaldhs Blue Moon deck, or Tomas Vlceks NicFit.

Legacy was announced as 1/3 of the formats for an upcoming Pro Tour next season. In my opinion, it’s a brilliant move by Wizards of the Coast to motivate Legacy specialists to try and qualify to try their skills versus the absolute elite. What’s your take on this in general and on a personal level?

In general I like the renowned interest in the best magic format. Many people will have a look into this format which they might have never tried before. This will help the community as more tournaments would get organized/ articles get written and so on.

For me personally it is a long wished but very high goal to play Legacy at the ProTour. Although qualifying seems to be really hard and I’m not looking forward to playing Standard to do so, haha. On the other hand I can’t wait to play at GP Birmingham!

Thanks a lot for your time. Hope to see you outplaying platinum pros on the biggest stage next year! In meantime, feel free to follow me on twitter and on my twitch channel. See you there! 🙂

Thomas Enevoldsen in Strasbourg

The healthiest constructed format in Magic

Hello everybody and welcome to the very first article from my hand here at Snapcardster.com. My name is Andreas, and I am a 29-year old MTG junkie residing in Copenhagen, Denmark. In the future I will be posting weekly content about everything from Pauper to Vintage, tournament results from Grand Prix or Magic Online tournaments, my own preparation for upcoming events, metagame analysis, player interviews and much, much more. If you want me to address a subject, don’t hesitate to write me a message on Facebook. Don’t be shy now!

Since I know many of you love Legacy, I thought a great place to kick things off would be talking about this weekend’s Legacy Challenge. For those who don’t know, “Challenges” are weekly tournaments on Magic Online with 7-8 rounds and top 8 with great prize payout. Why I like these tournaments in particular is the fact that they attract a lot of pros and/or format specialists, and the competition is therefor always top notch.

Legacy Challenge June 4, 2017
Read more at magic.wizards.com

2 Death and Taxes
1 Four Color Control
1 Elves
1 Blue/Black Shadow
1 Esper Deathblade
1 Blue/Red Delver
1 Grixis Delver

As you can see, the event was won by a spicy version of Death and Taxes in the hands of “Scabs” – the online handle of Thomas Enevoldsen – the Godfather of the deck. He and his partner in crime, gold pro Michael Bonde, put the deck on the map back in 2013 where they finished 1st and 3rd respectively at Grand Prix Strasbourg. More on that deck and Thomas’ success with it towards the end of the article.

Death and Taxes by Thomas 'Scabs' Enevoldsen (1st Place) Legacy Challenge #10664481 on 06/04/2017

Creature (26)
Containment Priest
Eldrazi Displacer
Flickerwisp
Mother of Runes
Palace Jailer
Phyrexian Revoker
Stoneforge Mystic
Thalia, Guardian of Thraben
Thalia, Heretic Cathar
Vryn Wingmare

Instant (4)
Swords to Plowshares

Artifact (7)
Aether Vial
Batterskull
Sword of Fire and Ice
Umezawa’s Jitte

Land (23)
Ancient Tomb
Eiganjo Castle
Karakas
Plains
Rishadan Port
Wasteland
Sideboard (15)
Palace Jailer
Chalice of the Void
Council’s Judgment
Dismember
Ethersworn Canonist
Gideon, Ally of Zendikar
Pithing Needle
Relic of Progenitus
Rest in Peace

 

R.I.PI want to talk a brief moment about the banning of Sensei’s Divining Top. Just have a look at that top 8 and let it sink in. There is no way that this much diversity would’ve found its way into the top 8 of a Legacy tournament just a few months ago. If this trend continues, I think it’s safe to say that Wizards made a brilliant move by banning the Top.

Ironically, if you take a look further down the list from the eight best decks, Miracles has found a way back to being relevant thanks to a forgotten card, Portent. Portent is no Sensei’s Divining Top, but it lets you set up Terminus and Entreat the Angels to some extent. With the engine of Snapcaster + Predict for card advantage and Jace, the Mind Sculptor in a bigger roll than before, Miracles 2.0 is happening. It will be very interesting to see if the deck can actually compete over time, or it’s just the stubborn Miracles players who refuse to take no for an answer right now and will eventually quit.

 

Legacy Format DiversityThe diversity is REAL this time.

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