6 Lessons from Danish Legacy Masters

Last weekend I attended a Legacy tournament called Danish Legacy Masters with 70 players, and I learned quite a few things from it that I would like to share today.

1. Preparation

As a surprise to absolutely no one, I sleeved up my trusty Four Color Control deck which I have played for ages online to good results. The more games I played in a tournament setting with the deck, the more comfortable I have gotten playing from behind. The nature of a control deck combined with the blazing speed of the opposition in Legacy (tempo and combo decks) dictates that you will be under pressure and have to dig yourself out of holes from time to time.

In the beginning I felt very uncomfortable and not the slightest confident in these spots, but all the practice and experience has turned that on its head. The deck is very capable of epic comebacks thanks to cards like Baleful Strix (blocker + cantrip into what else you need), Snapcaster Mage for similar reasons and Brainstorm to find the two cards you need and put an irrelevant card back netting virtual card advantage. There is no way I was able to top 4 this event without the experience and muscle memory that endless testing has provided.

Now I’m gonna go through some of my matchups for the day and give you my thoughts on the decks and my role against them.


2. Eldrazi

Rewind a month or two back, and I’m in the Legacy Challenge top 8 with a 5-1 record feeling confident. I get paired against a deck I had happily forgotten and get #smashed in two super fast games, crack my 25 treasure chests and go to sleep. My previous removal suite was constructed with Delver, Death and Taxes and Elves in mind and I was poorly set up to beat Eldrazi. I knew the deck would rise in popularity like the top 8 decks from the Challenges always do, so I was determined to tweak my removal spells before Danish Legacy Masters.

The compromise ended up being adding the fourth Baleful Strix and two Murderous Cut. Against non-Eldrazi and Gurmag Angler, I would be over paying for my removal spell, but Reality Smasher and the zombie fish needed to be dealt with, and I was happy with the trade off. Long story short, Murderous Cut saved my behind in the event as I was paired against Eldrazi twice.


3. Grixis Delver

In the semi finals I fell to Grixis Delver after three great games that could have gone either way, but instead of talking about that match in particular, I have some thoughts on the matchup.

With the full playset of Baleful Strix, three sweepers and a smattering of spot removal, I still feel the matchup is slightly above 50% for me. A friend of mine made a great point on Skype one day where I was playing against Grixis Delver and thought about sideboarding out 1 Leovold, Emissary of Trest and 1 Kolaghan’s Command because I was afraid of soft counters and Pyroblast. I’m boarding out Jace, the Mind Sculptor because of Daze and the cards I just mentioned and was looking to be more low to the ground.

He basically said

“you’re playing more lands than them, so you still need to make sure you have better cards than them because it’s gonna be a long grind most of the time”.

That stuck with me and is an excellent point.What’s the purpose of going smaller if your deck wants to play a long game anyway? We need to take advantage of the fact that we have better cards for the late game and find the right balance between winning the late game and surviving in the early game. Lesson learned.


4. Death and Taxes

This deck is very close to my heart, but in its current form you’re shooting your self in the foot by choosing it for a tournament. My friend and team mate Thomas Enevoldsen played three copies of Palace Jailer in his 75, and that’s definitely a step in the right direction. A few weeks ago I was checking decklists from the Legacy Challenge and saw a version splashing green for Choke and Sylvan Library in the sideboard. With 2-3 Jailers, 2 Chokes and 1-2 Libraries I can see the deck being competitive again. The mana base takes a small hit, but I think it’s worth it in a world of Kolaghan’s Command.


5. Black/Red Reanimator

The boogie man of the format was represented at this event, and I had the pleasure of losing to it in a match where we spent more time shuffling than playing. Yes, the deck is fragile and will sometimes mulligan to oblivion or lose to a Deathrite Shaman on the draw. Surgical Extraction and Flusterstorm try to up the percentages after sideboard, and Force of Will is sometimes enough.

My take away, and the reasons I played it at Grand Prix Las Vegas this summer, is that the deck punishes opponents who are either unprepared, unwilling to mulligan and players who simply didn’t find relevant disruption in their seven and six card hand. There are a lot of free wins playing a deck like this which will be important in a long tournament. Also make no mistake that this deck can produce a turn one Griselbrand a higher percentage of the time than you think and can beat a Force of Will even more often.


6. Elves

I had the pleasure of playing against Elves in the quarter finals. Not only because I was victorious, but because the games against a competent Elves opponent are always intense with a lot of punches being traded back and forth. Elves both has the ability to combo kill and grind you out, and an experienced green mage will search for a window to execute the combo plan while still playing for the long game with Elvish Visionary and Wirewood Symbiote.

Because their individual card quality is relatively poor, a simple spot removal is better than a one-for-one, Hymn to Tourach is more devastating than usual and sweepers and mulligans can really hurt their win percentage in the matchup. I was fortunate enough to experience all of these things this match and was able to take it down.

Until next time, may all your Hymn to Tourachs be double Sinkhole.

Brewer’s Kitchen: Splinter Twin in Legacy

Wait. Wasn’t this a Modern deck? And now you’re telling me that it’s viable in Legacy?

My name is Niklas Holtmann, this is my first guest article at Snapcardster and I’m not talking about a 100% competitive Legacy deck, but about a deck I had some success and just like to tell other people about stuff that’s not too mainstream. Welcome to Brewer’s Kitchen.


How it all started

On my way back home from MKM Frankfurt 2017 I just had this idea to play Splinter Twin in Legacy. Why? I’m not really sure about it, I just had a really bad tournament with Elves, a deck I was running hot with the last couple of months (Top 64 in Chiba and good results at our local tournaments), but after the ban of Sensei’s Divining Top I wasn’t really sure how to play with the deck so I ran my good old Elves without Natural Order which was really good for me in a format where Sensei’s Divining Top was legal. Needless to say, I was wrong. playing against Storm and Show&Tell was horrible.


Back to the drive home, I thought playing something like Splinter Twin could be really funny to troll people and to have some fun with blue cards in Legacy. After my ride home I didn’t think a lot about the deck until me and my friends were traveling to Hamburg for a weekend of Magic, alcohol and friends we don’t see that often, so I just went with it and played the following list:

UR Splinter Twin in Legacy

Creatures (11)
Pestermite
Deceiver Exharch
Snapcaster Mage
Vendilion Clique

Spells (30)
Force of Will
Brainstorm
Counterspell
Spellpierce
Spell Snare
Fire // Ice
Lightning Bolt
Ponder
Blood Moon
Splinter Twin
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
Lands (20)
Scalding Tarn
Flooded Strand
Arid Mesa
Island
Mountain
Volcanic Island
Plateau
Tundra

Sideboard (15)
True Name Nemesis
Engineered Explosives
Pithing Needle
Red Elemental Blast
Pyroblast
Flusterstorm
Wear // Tear
Rest in Peace
Surgical Extraction
Umezawas Jitte
Pyroclasm
Sudden Shock
Sulfur Elemental

I went 5:0:1 in that tournament.

So I have to admit, this deck wasn’t 100% my idea. Two years back I read an article on mtgthesource about a guy (Ma Ansbro) who made Top8 at the Eternal Weekend in the US with a Splinter Twin Deck that was Jeskai colors (well, he had Dig Through Time in his deck), so I took his list as an inspiration. The other inspiration was the Modern Blood Moon Splinter Twin deck.

I thought about the meta game I saw in Frankfurt and thought to myself that I have to punish all the greedy BUG Leovold Decks and the best thing I could find was Blood Moon and I really wanted to try out Splinter Twin just for the LOLs.

Due to my succes in that tournament I was hyped and thought about how I could improve the deck and what was good and bad about the deck. So obviously the worst thing in the deck is the Splinter Twin Combo and the deck wasn’t able to answer True-Name Nemesis and Sword of Fire and Ice, otherwise the deck was great, you can really get Legacy Players of guard with the combo and to Blood Moon out someone out of the game is awesome.


So I had to look at the bad cards in the deck which were:

Due to the fact that True-Name Nemesis was so hard to deal with and the best color to answer it is black, I shifted to splashing black in my deck, furthermore I cut Deceiver Exarch and replaced it with the 4th Pestermite and 2 Baleful Strix just because I thought that Delver is a bad Matchup, but having some Flyers to block and kill delver + being able to stall Gurmag Angler is really powerful.

With some more tournaments under my belt with the deck I came to the following list:

UBr Splinter Twin in Legacy

Creatures (11)
Pestermite
Snapcaster Mage
Baleful Strix
Vendillion Clique

Spells (30)
Force of Will
Brainstorm
Lightning Bolt
Counterspell
Spell Pierce
Fire // Ice
Kolaghan’s Command
Blood Moon
Splinter Twin
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
Ponder
Lands (20)
Island
Mountain
Swamp
Volcanic Island
Underground Sea
Badlands
Scalding Tarn
Polluted Delta
Bloodstained Mire

Sideboard (15)
Flusterstorm
Diabolic Edict
Red Elemental Blast
Pyroblast
Surgical Extraction
True-Name Nemeis
Fact of Fication
Abrade
Invasive Surgery
Engineered Explosives
Pyroclasm

And I have to tell you, I’m really happy with the list right now!

So why should YOU play this Deck?

Well, when you are a highly competitive player I can’t recommend playing the deck, just because there are some really hard match ups that need a lot of brainpower to win those and in some matchups you just lose Game 1 since you have so many bad cards in your deck. But when you are a johnny like me who just wants to try something different it’s a super good deck to do so, not because of the Twin Combo, but because of the power of Blood Moon and Jace.

The deck is super consistent in what it’s doing and Blood Mooning people out of the game is just one of the best things you can do in magic.

The next positive thing about the deck is that you have so many basics and you’re basically immune to Wasteland and slamming Jace consistently on turn 4 is really strong.

Last but not least, winning with Splinter Twin in Legacy is super funny due to the fact that there are many Legacy players out there who don’t know the combo and just randomly lose to it and as I said the LOLs are on your side.


Matchups:

Grixis Delver:

This matchup is really tough, winning through twin is just out of the question just because they have good removal, Daze or Stifle to attack your mana and their threats are super hard to beat. Deathrite Shaman taxes your Snapcaster Mages and Gurmag Angler and True-Name Nemesis are nearly unbeatable in game 1. But there is a chance: Blood Moon.

Game 2 gets a lot better because you can board out Splinter Twins and other bad cards to bring in True-Name Nemesis and more removal:

Boarding Plan against Grixis Delver

Out (11)
Splinter Twin
Pestermite
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
Force of Will
Spell Pierce

In (11)
Pyroclasm
Pyroblast
Red Elemental Blast
Abrade
True Name Nemesis
Engineered Explosives
Diabolic Edict
Flusterstorm

I like to board out some number of Force of Will against Delver decks just because of the card advantage, but also like some to get rid of threats that are hard to beat like True-Name Nemesis or to protect Blood Moon from countermagic. Pestermite isn’t that bad against Delver just because it blocks Delver and taps Gurmag Angler.


Lands

I think this is probably the best matchup you can get. They can’t beat Blood Moon game 1 and even if they get to Marit Lage you can just tap it the whole time. I had a game once where I tapped down Marit Lage for 5 turns with Fire // Ice or block it with Vendilion Clique and finish him off with the combo. The next advantage is putting their Life from the Loam on the bottom with Clique. You are also immune to their Wasteland.

Boarding Plan against Lands

Out (10)
Splinter Twin
Pestermite
Lightning Bolt

In (10)
Diabolic Edict
Surgical Extraction
Invasive Surgery
True-Name Nemesis
Abrade
Fact or Fiction
Engineered Explosives

After board they will have Krosan Grip for your Blood Moon but that’s fine. Diabolic Edict will kill their Marit Lage and Tireless Trackers.

Surgical Extraction for Life from the Loam, Punishing Fire or just in general the combo pieces when they are dredged. Invasive Surgery to have more counters for loam or Gamble.

True-Name Nemesis is a threat they can’t beat and that just wins you the game. Abrade kills Tireless Tracker, but it’s mainly there for random artefacts they bring in or to kill their Mox Diamond to screw their manabase under Blood Moon. Engineered Explosives kills Exploration or to handle Molten Vortex. Lastly I think a card advantage spell like Fact or Fiction is needed in the matchup just because you burn so many resources.


Sneak & Show

Another good matchup for our deck, we have good countermagic and can leave up mana to flash a threat in at the end of their turn. After boarding it get’s even better just because we have more countermagic and surgical extraction. The only weakspot for us is Boseiju, Who Shelters All, that’s why I tend to not board out Blood Moon.

Boarding Plan against Sneak & Show

Out (7)
Lightning Bolt
Baleful Strix
Fire // Ice

In (7)
Surgical Extraction
Flusterstorm
Red Elemental Blast
Pyroblast
Invasive Surgery

Sadly there are more cards you could board out but that’s ok, your cards are super efficient while their cards aren’t. You could argue to board out a Jace and they second Fire // Ice for the Strix to have a cantrip, but I like to win a counter war and than just play Jace to win the game. Fire // Ice can tap their lands and cantrip which I think is very helpful to buy a turn.


Czech Pile

This matchup is super tough, you will loose game 1 most of the time just because you have the Splinter Twin combo in your deck and they are a much better controldeck in game 1. That being said Blood Moon can still win you the game. The sad thing is that you always need an answer for Deathrite Shaman.

Game 2 gets a lot better just because they will fetch basics and cripple their manabase. Three Jaces are a real powerhouse in this matchup, but still it will be very tough for you.

Boarding Plan against Czech Pile

Out: (10)
Splinter Twin
Pestermite
Spell Pierce
Force of Will

In: (10)
Diabolic Edict
True-Name Nemesis
Red Elemental Blast
Pyroblast
Engineered Explosives
Abrade
Flusterstorm
Fact or Fiction

I’m not a big fan of Spell Pierce in matchups that go very long but being able to counter a Jace is very important. I bring in one Flusterstorm just because I think having too many forces against a deck that wants to 2 for 1 is not the place you want to be, but in the late game it’s often a dead card. You could bring in Pyroclasm as another removal for Deathrite Shamans but I think that’s to much with all the removal you already have.


What’s next?

I will continue playing the deck because I have a lot of fun grinding it and my results with it are pretty good for now.

If you like to want to know about more matchup or if you have general questions, hit me up on Facebook or Twitter 🙂

Thanks for reading

Meet the Pros: Andrea Mengucci

Hello Andrea and thank you for taking your time with me today! With the Pro Tour coming up, a lot of attention is on Standard. Looking at Standard from the outside these past few years has not been a pretty sight. What is the state of Standard right now in your opinion?

Standard is in a good place right now. It has quite few tier 1 decks, and they represent all the strategies of Magic:

  • Aggro: Mono Red
  • Midrange: Temur
  • Control: Blue/Black Control, Blue/White Approach
  • Combo: Gift

Those are all good decks that can be qualified as tier 1, so the format is definitely healthy. It isn’t Modern or Legacy where you have tons of different decks, but it has never been in the history of Standard. So I feel like this Standard is good and it is what it should always be.

A few months ago Wizards of the Coast announced Modern’s return to the Pro Tour in 2018. What was your first reaction to this?

I’m a little bit biased about the Modern Pro Tour because I hate Modern. It’s my least favorite format and I never play it – in fact last time I played it was World Magic Cup 2016. So I’m pretty sad about it and won’t test a lot of Constructed for the event, since the format is super stagnant and you can play any deck and go 10-0 or 0-10. But I can easily see Modern lovers standing up and shouting at me now, and I’ll be fine with that.

Everyone who follows you on social media and appreciates the great job you’re doing at ChannelFireball knows your passion for Legacy. Now all of a sudden you get to play your favorite format on the Pro Tour in 2018. Tell us why Legacy means so much to you.

I’m obviously very happy to show my Italian black bordered dual lands at the Pro Tour stage! But I don’t want this to be a thing that happens every Pro Tour or even once a year. The Pro Tour is good for innovations. You get an edge by inventing new decks in Standard and having a better strategy in Draft, but with stagnant formats like Modern and Legacy this goes away and that skill is less rewarded.

It seems like team tournaments will be a higher focus in competitive Magic moving forward. To me it is natural because you usually test as a group and root for your friends anyway. Do you feel the same way or would you rather play on your own all the time?

I really dislike where Grand Prix are going. I dislike that you have to be in a team of people to go to Grand Prix nowadays. What if you are good, but live in a environment where there are only bad players? You can just never spike.

For me Magic is an individual game, not soccer or basketball. It’s designed to be played 1 vs 1. It’s okay if sometimes you play 3 vs 3 because it’s more fun, but I feel like the 2018 Grand Prix schedule has way too many Team Grand Prix that punishes those who want to break through.

Lastly I want to hear about your personal expectations for the season. I know you’re representing Italy at the World Magic Cup. When we talk again at the end at the season, which accomplishments do you hope to tell me about?

I hope we’ll do well at Pro Tour Albuquerque, though it’ll be hard since Standard and Draft are already solved so variance will be huge once again and same for the World Magic Cup. I also have four Grand Prix coming up, so I hope to get my first top 8 in one of those, since it’s getting pretty late and I still haven’t achieved that goal in my Magic career.

To wrap up this interview, feel free to share your Twitter, thank your mom or give a shout out to sponsors. Thank you again for this interview!

Thanks for reading. You can follow me on Channel Fireball where I make two videos per week (Legacy and Vintage) and where I write one article per week (generic topic).

Also if you want to have daily tweets about Magic follow me on Twitter.

Beating Legacy #2

Make sure to check out the last episode if you haven’t already. Today we have two more decks on the menu, and hopefully you will be better equipped to beat them after reading the following.

Death and Taxes

A few years back, this deck was a joke in many people’s eyes and wasn’t taken too serious. However, it has gone from “a deck that only Danish pro players play” to a top 5 represented deck in the Legacy metagame in the meantime. Death and Taxes has always been a deck that impactful sideboard cards will help you to beat, and the realization that the deck was the real deal hasn’t exactly helped its’ position. More on those sideboard cards later.

What looks like a glorified White Weenie deck on the surface is a mean prison control deck at its’ core. Almost every card in the deck hopes to negate your opponent resources to a point where it can’t function, and their mediocre beatdown can bring your lifetotal to 0. Let’s have a look at some of the key cards and what they mean for their deck.

With a Vial on turn one, their win percentage increases dramatically. A free Black Lotus every turn, Flickerwisp tricks, any creature at instant speed, uncounterability and spare mana to activate Rishadan Port are just some of the advantages of an active Aether Vial. Prioritizing Vial with your Thoughtseize or Force of Will will often be correct, as all of their other cards get worse without it. Needless to say, you are happy every time they don’t play it on turn one. Not a lot of sideboard cards are worth using to deal with it, but Pithing Needle and various Disenchant effects are great vs. other parts of their deck and should be brought in.

removal spell. If you absolutely have to kill a creature, your own endstep is better than your mainphase. Keep in mind they can use it to reset a Phyrexian Revoker, get a new Germ token from Batterskull, remove an opposing blocker, get another trigger and equipment from Stoneforge Mystic or exile a land for the turn on your upkeep to keep you low on resources. If you know your opponent’s options with Flickerwisp, you can reduce its’ impact in the best way possible.

This Batman and Robin duo of lands will cause headaches unless you’re familiar with their impact. The threat of Wasteland will make you search out basic lands, but Rishadan Port can punish you for this by keeping you off colors and stranding spells in your hand – Death and Taxes‘ ultimate goal. Make sure to identify the games where you can afford to search out basic lands and the games where you need dual lands for your deck to function. This deck is very good at punishing you when you fail to find the correct solution.

Death and Taxes has quite a few creatures with only one toughness, so it’s only natural that the following sideboard cards are effective against it. In my opinion cards like Dread of Night and Sulfur Elemental are not worth it across the board, but with Elves, True-Name Nemesis and Young Pyromancer in the metagame, the following -1/-1 and similar effects are worthy of sideboard slots.


Eldrazi

Eldrazi has recently made a comeback in Legacy posting great results online and at the American Eternal Weekend. The Delver decks have done a great job of keeping various combo decks in check, and players are trying to fight the Delver decks with the cheapest removal spells around – namely Lightning Bolt and Fatal Push. Chalice of the Void on one and big creatures line up great against the new format without 15% Miracles and there for way fewer Swords to Plowshares around. Let’s get to know the enemy a little better.

You need cheap spells to beat Delver variants and combo decks, and Eldrazi will try and punish you for this. Having incidental answers for Chalice or playing a deck that is not super reliant on 1-mana spells are the ways to go. Examples of cards could be Kolaghan’s Command, Abrupt Decay or Flickerwisp while the decks could be Sneak and Show or 4 Color Aggro Loam. Decks like Grixis or Blue/Red Delver have a very hard time against Chalice where Sultai Delver will fare much better because of Abrupt Decay and Tarmogoyf which can outgrow Thought-Knot Seer and Reality Smasher on a regular basis.

Against stompy style decks which are definitely not the most consistent of decks, Force of Will and Daze have traditionally been great disruption tools. Because of the nature of non-Brainstorm decks, they will mulligan more and get messy draws. However, Cavern of Souls changes everything and I often times see my self praying they don’t have it when I’m holding the Force of Will for their big threat. You still need to keep in your Forces for games two and three, but they will make you sweat for it.

I love playing 4 Color Control, but I’ve been having a hard time losing to Eldrazi with my previous removal suite. I suggest thinking out of the box and toying around with your slots for removal spells a little to gain valuable percentages against Eldrazi. Here are some alternatives to the subpart Fatal Push and Lightning Bolt to improve your matchup against Eldrazi. Note that you can’t afford to cut these, but even one or two changes in your 75 will help.

 


Thanks a lot for reading this far. I will do Beating Legacy #3 featuring Elves and Sneak Attack in the not so distant future!

Beating Legacy #1

November 5th there is a huge Legacy tournament in Copenhagen called “Danish Legacy Masters“. As this is a tournament with great tradition and players coming in from not only all parts of Denmark, but also from Sweden and Germany, I can’t wait to play.

I have four top 8‘s with one win and one finals split in this tournament series over the years, and I’m hoping to add to my resume this time around. But I’m getting way ahead of me because in order to win, you need to prepare! So tag along as I try and break down the most relevant decks to prepare for. Welcome to “Beating Legacy“!

Storm

Storm uses Dark Ritual, Cabal Ritual, Lotus Petal and Lion’s Eye Diamond to accelerate out Ad Nauseam or Past in Flames either natural drawn or found with Infernal Tutor. The tutor makes sure you can end your turn by searching up a lethal Tendrils of Agony. To clear the way of pesky counter magic, a total number of 6 or 7 Cabal Therapy and Duress are included.

Some opening hands allow for quick kills where others need to set up a later kill with the numerous cantrips. Gitaxian Probe provides free information about the opponent’s hand, while Brainstorm and Ponder do their usual job of digging for what you need.

In order to give yourself the best chance of beating Storm, you need to fight them on several axis. In my experience, if you can attack Storm on at least two of the following areas, you are in good shape:

1) Clock. The faster you can get them low on life, the better. The damage also interacts favorably with Ad Nauseam.
2) Counter magic. Counterspells are good, and Flusterstorm is the best of the bunch.
3) Discard spells. Going for their hand is good for obvious reasons and provides information on how to play out your hand.
4) Graveyard hate. Attacking the graveyard means that Ad Nauseam or Empty the Warrens are their only path to victory.
5) Hateful permanents. They will only have a few answers to permaments in their deck, so getting one into play around their discard spells is important.


Grixis Delver

Many color combinations of Delver decks have come and gone through the years, but in 2017 it’s all about Grixis. Deathrite Shaman is too good not to play and needs black mana, and your removal spell of choice – Lightning Bolt – can finish off players and still kill most of the creatures in the format. Furthermore, red offers some great sideboard options while also adding Young Pyromancer to the threat base. Speaking of which, their different threats can’t be dealt with by the same cards, so keep that in mind.

They usually run a full playset of Deathrite Shaman and Delver of Secrets and then a mix of Young Pyromancer, Gurmag Angler and True-Name Nemesis. While Fatal Push and Lightning Bolt take care of the first two, and True-Name and Pyromancer die to various -1/-1 effects, the Angler is very resilient to non-Swords to Plowshares removal. The difficulty of dealing with its creatures is one of the deck’s greatest strengths.

Playing and hopefully winning against Grixis Delver demands that you can navigate around some of their most important disruptive cards. Let’s go through them one by one.

“Can I afford to play around Wasteland?” is the most important question you have to ask your self. I’ve seen my share of players who played around Wasteland and as a result weren’t able to cast all of their spells. Don’t be that guy. Sometimes you need to make them have it and power through it, and sometimes you need to bridge a gap between two turns where you are immune to Wasteland. Storm and Sneak and Show are the most common decks for these situations with turn 1 basic Island and a cantrip.

Daze raises different questions than Wasteland, but they have their similarities. Early in the game you have to take stand to whether you can play around Daze all game or you’re going to run into it eventually. Keep in mind though, that waiting one turn to boost your odds of resolving a spell can backfire against a tempo deck like Grixis Delver. Wasteland, Cabal Therapy and Force of Will from the top of their library can punish you for sandbagging spells in fear of Daze, so I suggest you cast your spells on curve the majority of the time unless it’s a crucial one.

Playing around Cabal Therapy can be a few things. You need a lot of knowledge about what your opponent is most likely to name depending on the situation, which can be very hard. You should make sure not to have two of the same card in hand if you can avoid it. Aside from Brainstorm and Ponder, another way to do this is playing out the card you have two copies of if you have to decide between two spells for the turn. For example, if you have two Thalia, Guardian of Thraben and one Stoneforge Mystic in hand, chances are you should be playing out the Thalia regardless of what the best play would be in respect of the Therapy.

Stifle in combination with Wasteland can really mess up your plans. In some scenarios, fetching out a nonbasic before the opponent has mana for Stifle, even though they run 4 Wasteland, can be the correct play. Sometimes you need to play out fetch lands and cast no spells and make your opponent keep up the mana long enough for the Stifle to be irrelevant or until they decide to make a move. Since they run relatively few lands, chances are that they will not be able to advance the board while keeping up Stifle. Be proactive if you don’t have the ability to keep making land drops or wait it out – your deck will typically be better in the long game.

That will do it for the first installment of Beating Legacy. Next week I will be back with some more tips and tricks for a few relevant Legacy matchups. In the meantime please add your best advice for beating Storm and Grixis Delver in the comments on facebook, twitter, reddit or where ever you are reading this.

Legacy is All About Leovold

For those of you who have been living under a rock for the last six months, I can tell you that the “best” deck in Legacy is a four-colored control deck in which you can play any non-white card. The deck plays a lot of powerful cards, and its’ goal is to prolong the game so the superior card quality can take over – kind of like how “Jund” was looked at in Modern a few years back. Today I’m going to analyze what having 4 Color Control at the top of the metagame percentages means for the format.

Why is 4 Color Control a popular choice?

First things first. This deck’s game plan appeals to a lot of good players because they get to play a long game of Magic and gain small advantages here and there which ultimately gives you a higher chance of winning the game. When taking a look at the following list, which is not only a list of awesome Magic, but also the core of 4 Color Leovold, you suddenly understand why players want to play this deck.



Metagame reactions caused by 4 Color Control

The dreaded Black/Red Reanimator that was all the rage to start the year has slowly disappeared from the format thanks to too many decks starting off the game with Deathrite Shaman. I guess 4 Color Control can only take the blame partially for this one.

My team mate and Death & Taxes specialist Michael Bonde said on Skype the other day that Kolaghan’s Command has pushed his favorite deck all the way to the edge of playability and that every time he beats 4 Color Control, he feels like the luckiest man on the planet.

People tried their hardest to come up with a playable Blood Moon deck to fight the heavy amount of nonbasic lands in the format. Maybe this Chandra deck is the answer?

Grixis Delver players started experimenting with grindy sideboard plans that included Kolaghan’s Command and Painful Truths among other typical controllish cards.Nic Fit, a Green/Black/X based ramp built around Veteran Explorer and Cabal Therapy synergies, has started to pick up steam lately. In a world where Swords to Plowshares is running rampant, the Explorer simply is not a playable Magic card.

The only answer for this card out of 4 Color Control is usually Force of Will and possibly a singleton Abrupt Decay, which is good news. Having Sylvan Library in play will generate a ton of card advantage because you don’t really care about your life total when playing against 4 Color Control. Most of their cards create card advantage, and now you can fight on even terms instead of bringing a knife to a gunfight. This card’s stock is way up these days.

Green/Black Turbo Depths, which only route to victory is the 20/20 indestructive Marit Lage token, is a natural predator of 4 Color Control due to the lack of exile-based removal. In a world of Wasteland and Terminus, this deck was hardly a factor.

Some Delver pilots switched to a more burn-heavy version playing only Blue and Red to punish the mana base of 4 Color Control with Price of Progress.

Lately I’ve been playing against a few Eldrazi decks, but I don’t have enough data to call it a metagame reaction. One thing is for sure: if that deck is climbing to 5% of the metagame, I will have to re-evaluate my removal suite to combat Reality Smasher better.

My Version of 4 Color Control – October 2017

Recently I played the deck to a top 4 finish at the weekly Legacy Challenge on Magic Online, and here is my list. Allow me to talk about a few interesting card choices.

I like two copies of Diabolic Edict in the deck mainly because of Gurmag Angler, True-Name Nemesis and the Marit Lage token. If your opponent Show and Tells a Griselbrand into play, the Edict can do great things combined with Leovold. This slot is definitely a hedge, because most of the time you will be spending two mana to kill a creature and wish it was a Fatal Push or Lightning Bolt.

This is fairly controversial, and those who follow my stream will know how I feel about this. Ponder is better in a deck where you are looking for specific cards and in decks where you play a low number of lands. However, in a deck with 20 or more lands like this one, I’m mostly looking to keep the engine running not looking for anything specific most of the time. The trade off is that you avoid the awkward situations where Ponder reveals one card you want and two cards you don’t want which leads to shuffling a lot of the time unless you have an uncracked fetch land at the ready. With Preordain you lose some potential upside, but you’re getting a much more consistent cantrip for your control deck. Needless to say, I suggest at least giving Preordain a try in this archetype.

I recently added a second copy of this effect, and it performed right from the start. Aside from the obvious function of dealing with Blood Moon, hasty creatures and a lethal Price of Progress, this little gem works wonders in the mirror match. In games two and three, Pyroblast play a huge role and looping Kolaghan’s Command with Snapcaster Mage is a great way to win a close game. Furthermore, you can counter opposing Sneak Attack or Burning Wish at a cheap cost.

Another great tool to fight the inevitable mirror match when entering a Legacy tournament. She can buy back your creatures that your opponent already spent resources killing, and she can ping Baleful Strix and Snapcaster Mage while ticking up. Not a lot of cards are worth using to deal with resolved Strixes and Snapcasters, but this Liliana qualifies. Making your life easier vs. Elves and Death & Taxes is just gravy.

Chandra has made her way into Legacy because she’s a house in the mirror. She dodges Pyroblast and can be very tough to deal with for the opponent unless they have a huge board presence or two burn spells in hand – something that is very hard to accomplish in the mirror match where you have basically the same cards. Deathrites getting killed, Hymn to Tourach both directions, Leovold or Jace, the Mind Sculptor being countered by Pyroblast is how a lot of games go. In these situations, Chandra will be a huge draw thanks to her ability to draw extra cards and deal with a single creature at the time. Maybe it’s off topic, but I won a game vs. Blood Moon thanks to her.

The rest of the list speaks for itself, but please feel free to ask if I missed something interesting.

I hope you guys enjoyed reading about my thought on 4 Color Control. If you have anything to add or think I’m telling lies, let me know in the comments and let’s have a great discussion!

In the coming weeks I will be publishing two or three articles about “Beating Legacy“, so make sure you don’t miss those.

Introducing: Thomas Enevoldsen

Hello and welcome to Team Snapcardster! Could you give a quick introduction of your self?

My name is Thomas Enevoldsen, I’m 29 years old and I work full time as an attorney in Denmark. I started playing Magic in 2003 (during Mirrodin) and tournament Magic in 2004 (Champions of Kamigawa prerelease!). My first deck was a Green/Red Beast tribal deck and my last deck was a Blue/Black control deck from Danish Nationals last weekend. So I have evolved somewhat over the past 14 years.


For the people (shame on them!) who might not be too familiar with your previous accomplishments, can you highlight a few of them?

1st at World Magic Cup 2014
1st at Grand Prix Strasbourg (Legacy)
Top 4 at Grand Prix Prague (Legacy)
1st at Danish Nationals 2009
1st at Danish Nationals 2013

We have all played Magic for quite some time, and we all have different reasons to do so. What keeps your engine running after all these years?

The bigger perspective is self-realization and an ever-growing desire not to lose. On a smaller scale, what I love the most about tournament Magic is the experience of playing against opponents who care just as much about winning as you do. Everybody plays to win. To squeeze as much as possible out of every little resource the game has to offer. This mentality is not easy to find in other situations in life. People generally live recreationally – like they are playing kitchen table Magic. You don’t necessarily need to give a 100 % at work or studies, relationships even, and you’ll probably still be fine. But in Magic, if you leave an inch on the table, someone else is going to pick it up. And I love the fight for that inch.

What is your favorite format and why?

I can’t really decide. I used to believe it was legacy, since that is where most of my good results come from. From a strict game perspective, I love sealed the most, since it is essentially two games in one (building and playing), and both rewards creativity more so than other formats where most games are decided by the power of the cards and the order they were drawn in. From a fun perspective, nothing really beats team drafting, both for the team spirit on your team and the bragging rights against your opponents. There is always so much more on the line in team draft, because your pride is at stake!

Looking into the crystal ball, what does the next 12 months have in store for you MTG-wise?

Attend as many European Grand Prix as possible, play the odd Magic Online qualifiers and generally just aim to get on the Pro Tour again. Whatever format, whatever city. Just get back.

Thank you so much for taking your time. Feel free to leave your Twitter handle, so people can keep up with your magical endeavours in the future!

No problem!

Follow Thomas Enevoldsen on

Twitter: @therealenevolds

Introducing: Michael Bonde

Hello and welcome to Team Snapcardster! Could you give a quick introduction of your self?

Hello there! My name is Michael Bonde, I live in Aarhus in Denmark and I am 30 years old. I am partly a Magic “pro” and finishing my education this year as a teacher in English, History and Sports.


For the people (shame on them!) who might not be too familiar with your previous accomplishments, can you highlight a few of them?

Of course I will. My resume is a bit across formats:

17th PT Shadows over Innistrad (lost win & in for top 8)

3-4th at Grand Prix Strasbourg (Legacy)

3-4th at Grand Prix Madrid (Limited)

5th at Grand Prix Sao Paulo (Team Limited)

10th at Grand Prix San Diego (Limited)

1st at Bazaar of Moxen 8 (Vintage)

1st at StarCityGames Worcester (Standard)


We have all played Magic for quite some time, and we all have different reasons to do so. What keeps your engine running after all these years?

I see the game as a giant puzzle. Every new format brings something different to the mix and draws on different information from the past.

This makes almost every game different in some degree, but still within the region that one can practice and master. I love dedicating myself towards a goal of trying to become the best, within my own style of play. Being able to follow this process and see results is really something unique – for me at least.

In the beginning it was the mastering of play by play, and even though this is still an evergreen focus, more and more layers add-on which makes it even more complicated and interesting.

What is your favorite format and why?

I’m always a bit torn when someone asks me this question, because the answer is I really just love magic! The formats I often play the most are Legacy, Draft and Sealed.

Legacy is a static format where you can build up a giant database of decks, plays, matchups and try to get perfect information due to many matchups and games play out alike and there is often a right or wrong thing to do. Drafting and doing sealed are on the other hand a bit more fluid. You get to solve the “format” and every game is completely different. You need to be aware of both drafting the correct deck, color pairs, card choices in each color and compared to picks already made. Furthermore it is insanely complex and a very fun topic to dig into and discuss with peers.

Looking into the crystal ball, what does the next 12 months have in store for you MTG-wise?

First of all I am in the Pro Players Club with Silver.

My plan is to qualify for 2-3 of the Pro Tours this season and as a minimum cross the threshold for being Silver again for next season.

This means that I will be playing more Magic Online Championship on Magic Online, play a fair amount of Grand Prix’s and try and do my best at the Pro Tour scene.

Nothing is given, but I will do my best to evolve as a player and have fun while doing it.

Thank you so much for taking your time. Feel free to leave your Twitter handle, so people can keep up with your magical endeavours in the future!

Follow Michael Bonde on

Twitter: @lampalot

Magic Online: lampalot

Twitch: MichaelBonde

The Fun Police

This week I’ve chosen to play a Legacy League with one of my favorite decks besides Storm which is Death and Taxes. This deck originated as mono-white creature deck that will often play the control role with Thalia, Guardian of Thraben, Rishadan Port and the likes but with the ability to switch on the beats too utilizing Stoneforge Mystic. Through the years several splashes have been attempted.


Black for Discard, Dark Confidant and Tidehollow Sculler; green for Gaddock Teeg, Qasali Pridemage and Scavenging Ooze; even blue for Meddling Mage, Vendilion Clique and the likes.

But the most persistent splash has been red with Magus of the Moon plus effective sideboard options which has proven to have legs to stand on. However, the mono-white version still seems like the most popular over all and it’s the one I have the most experience with so that is what I decided to play.

Death and Taxes by Martin Nielsen

Creatures (31)
Thalia, Guardian of Thraben
Serra Avenger
Recruiter of the Guard
Flickerwisp
Mirran Crusader
Sanctum Prelate
Mother of Runes
Ethersworn Canonist
Spirit of the Labyrinth
Stoneforge Mystic
Phyrexian Revoker
Swords to Plowshares

Spells (7)
Batterskull
Sword of Fire and Ice
Umezawa’s Jitte
Aether Vial
Lands (22)
Wasteland
Rishadan Port
Cavern of Souls
Horizon Canopy
Karakas
Plains

Sideboard (15)
Path to Exile
Sunlance
Containment Priest
Disenchant
Ethersworn Canonist
Holy Light
Council’s Judgment
Sanctum Prelate
Mindbreak Trap
Faerie Macabre
Grafdigger’s Cage
Rest in Peace

This deck relies upon Legacy being Legacy which is to say it relies on your opponent playing decks that try and maximize efficiency by playing a bunch of 1CMC spells and not very many lands. Thalia is a great foil to 1CMC spells effectively doubling their casting cost. Ponder is a lot less impressive at 1U. The deck also utilizes Aether Vial to tremendous effect.

An Aether Vial on 3 suddenly turns Flickerwisp from a rather arduous 3 mana 3/1 into an instant speed uncounterable Swiss army knife saving your permanents from removal, revoming lands from your opponent for their entire turn and resetting your own Batterskull but to name a few.

This deck wants to play against other “fair” decks with blue. It has ways to beat other decks too, but this is where it shines the most in my opinion. Where it can struggle is against the ultra fast combo decks of the format. The faster they are, the worse it normally is for D&T. Among the tier one decks Elves seems to be just about the worst matchup for D&T. This is not because Elves is super fast combo.

It is fast, for sure, but not compared to stuff like Goblin Charbelcher, Tin Fins or even Storm. The real problem lies in the fact that Thalia, Guardian of Thraben – normally your go-to creature against all combo – is practically useless here since the vast majority of their deck are creatures. Combine that with the fact that they can produce enormous amounts of mana through Gaea’s Cradle and Heritage Druid and you’ve got a recipe for a very difficult game 1.

How Hard? Pretty Hard!

This deck is NOT easy to play. I noticed, last year, when Recruiter of the Guard and Sanctum Prelate had just been printed that there was a lot of talk about how the deck had gotten a huge boost and how it was now well positioned in the format. A lot of people picked up the deck. Not that many did well with it. Eventually its popularity waned and after Miracles was banned out of the format a lot of people were saying that D&T was no longer that great a choice. Not long after it won GP Las Vegas.

Now all of this is somewhat anecdotal but I believe this deck rewards dedication more than the average Legacy deck. Bear with me:

When you pick up something like Storm – which a lot of people have a preconceived notion about as being “really hard to be good with” – then there is a learning curve. The first few months you will get egg on your face a few times.

Sit and count for a minute while looking at your hand, then your graveyard, then your hand. Then going for it only to realize, halfway through your Past in Flames, that you shouldn’t have flashbacked Gitaxian Probe before Infernal Tutor as it drew you a land that you can’t cast and now you’re no longer hellbent… Oops!

But after a few months those types of situations will mostly be a thing of the past and you will start to get a lot of stuff ingrained on your spine like muscle memory. You will start to have lines of play memorized so you don’t have to spend 1 minute to work out the deterministic kill in front of your eyes but rather just 5-10 seconds. Play the deck some more and you will become more and more comfortable playing around different types of hate. At this point in your career as a Storm pilot let’s say you have maximized the deck to around 80%.

From here, the last 20 % will come only with years of playing. But even if you don’t have that in your locker, you are now a firm pilot being able to perform well with the deck.

It is my contention that, if repeating the same effort with Death and Taxes, you will be more likely to hit around 50% maximization. I don’t personally feel like I’ve ever moved much beyond that. Because that would like take a few years of really dedicating myself to the deck to get near something like 70-80% let alone full potential.

Look, this isn’t rocket science. But when the same very few people continue to do well with the deck then I don’t think it’s to do with them being savants or members of Mensa. I mean they might well be, but I think the deck will reward most people if they only dedicate themselves as much as these archetype experts. The only problem is, it will take longer to reach the summit with this deck than with many other decks in Legacy.

That is my contention, like I said, but you don’t have to agree with it. If you do or if you don’t I would love to chat about it so feel free to leave a comment below.

If you like these videos be sure to subscribe to my Youtube channel.

It’s a miracle: Back-to-Back Victory

© 2017 photo credit: magiccardmarket.eu

Editorial Note: “It’s a miracle: Back-to-Back Victory” is a guest entry by Johannes Gutbrod. Read more about Johannes in “Meet the Pros: Johannes Gutbrod, Legacy”. Johannes Gutbrod is not affiliated with Snapcardster.com

After Show-and-Telling in Frankfurt I was testing a lot of different archetypes but mostly various miracle variants. In may I began testing an UWB MentorMiracles deck. It was the Ovino list from my good friend Claudio Bonanni, which I thought had more potential as he seemed to think himself.

After months of testing we both came to the conclusion that the red splash is superior to the black one at the moment. Blood Moon is a hell of a card and helps with the harder MU’s like Eldrazi, Czech Pile or Lands. Pyroclasm is great against Delver, Elves and Death and Taxes and Pyroblasts are still superior to Discard effects in the control mirror.

We figured if we could somehow fix the combo matchups (we upped the number of Ethersworn Canonist), the UWR-variant would be better in every regard.

In the last weeks we settled on a quite stock list, but were still differing in 4-6 cards in the 75. This is the 75 I registered for the Legacy Main Event:

Not Quite Miracles by Johannes Gutbrod

Creatures (7)
Snapcaster Mage
Monastery Mentor

Spells (33)
Brainstorm
Ponder
Portent
Counterspell
Flusterstorm
Daze
Force of Will
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
Swords to Plowshares
Terminus
Engineered Explosives
Predict
Lands (20)
Tundra
Volcanic Island
Scalding Tarn
Flooded Strand
Arid Mesa
Island
Plains
Mountain

Sideboard (15)
Flusterstorm
Pyroblast
Blood Moon
Surgical Extraction
Ethersworn Canonist
Vendilion Clique
Pyroclasm
Wear // Tear
Relic of Progenitus

The Relic of Progenitus was a late addition as I wanted another card for Grixis/ Grixis Control and still have the same amount of graveyard-hate. We were 295 players, and here is the part you all came for:

Round 1: Deathblade 1:2
G1: My opponents overextends and Force of Wills two Terminus, of which I force back to resolve the second one. I try to fetch for a Dual to make him use his Wasteland and turn on my Daze for a potential True-Name Nemesis. He does so but finds another land with his last draw slams True-Name Nemesis and I don’t find an answer in four turns.
G2: Opponent keeps one land.
G3: Double Lingering Souls are quite good in this matchup…

Round 2: OmniSneak 2:1
G1: I’m still trying to figure out what my opponent is on until he plays a Boseiju, Who Shelters All turn three. I think I’m pretty much dead, as my hand is slow. Next turn I can resolve a Jace, the Mind Sculptor and manage to lock him out with Portent + Jace while countering all his cantrips aggressively.
G2: Got combo’d out.
G3: Ethersworn Canonist rides to a close victory.

Round 3: Grixis Control 2:1
G1: Hymn to Tourach and early beatz bring me into Lightning Bolt range, and when I finally stabilize it is too late.
G2/ G3: My superior control cards (Predict!) take those games.

Round 4: Czech Pile 2:0
G1: We play draw-go for a while until I find a window to resolve my Jace, the Mind Sculptor. He fights back quite well with several Snapcaster Mages and Kolaghan’s Command, but in the end Monastery Mentor joins the party and he gets monk’d out.
G2: Blood Moon is a fair magic card, no?! 😉

Round 5: SneakShow 2:0
G1/ G2: These games were similar to my first match against OmniSneak. In the first game Jace, the Mind Sculptor drew me a lot of cards as well.

Round 6: Elves 2:1
G1: Can’t find a Terminus in time before I get run over.
G2: Is a long fight, involving Pyroclasm, Nissa, Vital Force and Jace, the Mind Sculptor. The blue planeswalker helps me establishing control in the end.
G3: We go to time. My opponent kindly scoops, as a draw in this stage of the tournament is pretty bad for both of us. Thanks again!

Round 7: Lands 2:0
G1/ G2: I aggressively counter Gamble to prevent Life from the Loam-shenanigans and win with Jace, the Mind Sculptor. It helped that he didn’t find Punishing Fire in game one as well (I fatesealed him out in the end).

Round 8: Goblins 2:1
G1: My opponent is seemingly nervous and mulls a hand that’s good against miracles but bad against the rest of the format as he fortunately doesn’t know what I’m playing. He ends up going to 4 cards, though.
G2: Aether Vial on four and several Goblin Ringleaders find too much gas for me to handle.
G3: This one is really close, I can Force of Will a crucial Tarfire targeting my Mentor. Next turn I resolve Jace, the Mind Sculptor and keep my army back to defend him. He taps out for Goblin Ringleader and I have the window to prowess my army and slam Pyroclasm to extinguish his board and swing for the win.

Round 9: TurboDepths 2:0
The draw could leave me at a potential ninth place, so I decide to choose my fate myself and play it out.
G1: I play Monastery Mentor, Swords to Plowshare on Marit Lage and beat him slowly down while he bricks and gets Portented out of the game.
G2: Instead of cantripping I decide to leave my mana open, even if he just has a forest. He tries to play Crop Rotation, I have Flusterstorm and the game is basically over as he can’t cast any spells.

After the dust settles I’m 8:1, and second place in the final standings.

Quarters: Elves 2:1
G1: I fail to find cantrips and die with all the good stuff in hand.
G2/ G3: Mass removal, Jace, the Mind Sculptor and a hail-mary Terminus for his Progenitus.

Semis: UnexpectedMiracles 2:0 (these matches are covered on the MkM-site as well)
G1: My hand is very blueish, and I resolve Predicts and Snapcaster Mages while countering his.
G2: I manage to tap him out with an end-of-turn Vendilion Clique and mainphase Monastery Mentor, so that my hand with Daze + Ponder can go completely out of hand. Later I manage to fateseal a crucial Terminus to the bottom and make my way to the finals.

Finals: RUG Lands 2:1
G1: The game lasts for forty minutes and in the end I have just 8 cards left in my library. The game is basically Life from the Loam vs. Jace, the Mind Sculptor. Unfortunately after 14 hours of Legacy I miss a trigger of The Tabernacle at Pendrell Vale, that might have enabled another sequence and could have won. Happens!
G2: Relic of Progenitus takes away a lot of goodies and Jace, the Mind Sculptor fateseals him out of the game.
G3: I can clear away his first turn Chalice of the Void on one with Engineered Explosives and play my hand with a lot of cantrips. I hold my Blood Moon for a long time until he finally taps under three mana. Then I cast the enchantment and he scoops them up. Props to his beautiful foiled out lands deck though.

Hope you enjoyed the read, see you all in Hamburg!

Johannes Gutbrod