Farfetched: Ramping with Titan Shift

After I finished my last article, a friend of mine messaged me on Facebook and asked me about the land patterns for the deck, as he wanted to play the deck at Grand Prix Phoenix. I realized that this topic is very important if you’re picking up the deck, so I decided to do a little bonus article about it. Welcome to Farfetched!

For reference, here is the decklist that I top’2 Grand Prix Madrid with going 13-3 individually.

I used to run a slightly different split of fetches with the nod to Bloodstained Mire over Windswept Heath. Bloodstained Mire lets you fetch basic Mountain on turn two, and Windswept Heath is better against Blood Moon when you want a Forest out of your deck as soon as possible. When you’re in the market of building your Mountain count, you will have to shock your self with Windswept Heath on turn two.

Stomping Ground is your early game Taiga that will cost you some lifepoints. On the play against an aggressive deck, it’s not rare that you shock your self and pass the turn with Lightning Bolt up anticipating a one drop from the opponent to make sure you can curve out your Farseek or Sakura-Tribe Elder next turn. Also fetching out Stomping Ground over Forest on turn one to suspend Search for Tomorrow is almost always right in the dark. The exception is against aggressive strategies or when you’re already holding a Scapeshift, because Scapeshift kills the opponent either way and only Primeval Titan cares about your Mountain count. You often fetch out Stomping Ground on your opponent’s end step for obvious reasons.

Cinder Glade is your late game Taiga that you sometimes have to work  a little for. Most games will leave you with two basic lands in play no matter what you do, but some games you will have to fetch out basic Mountain with your fetchland or Farseek in order to make the Cinder Glade in your hand an untapped land for Primeval Titan on time. You fetch out Cinder Glade with Farseek when you only have non basics in play and would rather draw Stomping Ground from the top of your deck than Cinder Glade.

During a long tournament like a Grand Prix, I expect you to cycle this card once or twice, and most of the time search it out with Farseek or fetchlands with hands that don’t want to draw a ETB tapped land off the top.

You will fetch out this land turn one against Burn when you have the Search for Tomorrow or later in the game when you already have five Mountains and no Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle on the battlefield, because you want as many Mountains in your deck as possible. The other reason is Blood Moon. I’ve encountered situations more than once where I resolve Summoner’s Pact and Primeval Titan against a deck that potentially has Blood Moon. In these situations, I will search up two Forests (or the last one if I already have one) to make sure I don’t lose to the pact trigger. Overall Forest is the most unexciting land in your deck, but rather a necessary evil thanks to red mages.

The good old basic Mountain will give you painfree Mountain development. When you’re going for a late game Scapeshift, make sure to beat Ghost Quarter and Field of Ruin by leaving at least one Mountain in your deck. They will also come in handy for super grindy games against Control and Jund where you’re trying to natural Valakut them out. A few times I’ve run out of actual basic Mountains in my deck to make Sakura and Search useless as Lighting Bolt impersonaters. Don’t put your self in that situation, so manage your total number of Mountains just as carefully as your basic and non basic number.

I think I got it all, but feel free to ask if I missed anything or something is unclear.

Andreas Petersen

Andreas Petersen

Content Producer at Snapcardster
Andreas is probably better known as "ecobaronen" on MTGO. After 2nd place of Team Trios #GPMadrid playing Modern he's heading to his second Pro Tour in Minneapolis this year. Andreas has an opinion about every constructed format except Standard.
Andreas Petersen

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