First Data from the Jace and Bloodbraid Era

Dead Format, BUT…

While the format for Grand Prix Lyon this past weekend was Modern, the data from that tournament is not as interesting as it could have been, as the tournament used the old banned list (no Jace, the Mind Sculptor or Bloodbraid Elf allowed). However, the winning deck played by my fellow Snapcardster goon, Polish platinum-aspiring pro player, Grzegorz ‘urlich00’ Kowalski, might have a shot in the new metagame thanks to its’ individual high card quality and hasty creatures.

If you want to learn more about Red/Green Eldrazi, head over to our friends at Hareruya and read his words about the deck now and moving forward.  I love the interaction between Ancient Stirrings and Crumble to Dust in a deck with mana acceleration.

Modern Challenge February 17

A few days ago, approximately 140 players tried their hand at the fresh format and decided to participate in the weekly “Modern Challenge” on Magic Online. The competition is always fierce online, so I figured it would be a great sneak peak to the new metagame to take a look at the top 32 finishing decks from that event.

Top 32

* = Jace, the Mind Sculptor decks
+ = Bloodbraid Elf decks

  • 4 Burn
  • 3 Blue/Red Control (1 Thing in the Ice, 1 Kiki-Jiki, 1 Breach/Emrakul)*
  • 2 Red/Black Hollow One
  • 2 Green/X Tron
  • 2 Jund Midrange+
  • 2 Dredge
  • 2 Humans
  • Grixis Shadow
  • Blue/White Turns*
  • Grixis Control*
  • Living End
  • Bant Knightfall
  • Bushwacker Zoo
  • Tribal Zoo+
  • Storm
  • Jeskai Ascendancy
  • Affinity
  • Temur Midrange*+
  • Blue/White Control*
  • Ad Nauseam
  • Mono Red Prison
  • Blue/Black Mill

check out all the decklists of the modern challenge

Jace in Mind

The final of the tournament ended up being a Burn mirror match, and while that doesn’t tell the whole story, there are some important things to take note of. If you look closely at the metagame breakdown above, you will notice that most decks either were Jace decks themselves, tried to go under Jace decks (fast aggressive strategies like Burn, Humans, Hollow One, Affinity, Dredge and Zoo variants), was packing the natural predator of Jace – Bloodbraid Elf or was trying to punish opposing blue mages for tapping out on their fourth turn (true for Ad Nauseam, Jeskai Ascendancy and Living End). The point is that a lot of decks in the format can continue go about their business, as they are already set up pretty well against Jace.

On the other hand, I don’t think players have come close to finding the best shell for Jace yet, so in the meantime Jace players will not only need to plan for a diverse field of proactive decks, they also need to prepare for the pseudo mirror match. New formats, whether it being a Standard rotation or unbannings in the case of Modern, have traditionally favoured proactive strategies, and this is no exception. Jace will need some more time to reach his full potential.

Less is Not More

The next few days after the banned and restricted announcement, I was afraid that this would make the number of playable decks in Modern smaller. While I’m not 100% convinced the opposite is the case yet, the weekend’s results were a step in the right direction. Modern is the most popular format because of its’ diversity, and I would hate for it to end up like Standard or Vintage with only a handful of truly playable decks. 25 different decks in a top 32 only happens in one format. Fingers crossed this continues moving forward.

Zero Lantern and Zero Bogles

Also interesting to note, no Lantern Control or Green/White Hexproof decks placed well in this tournament. Coming off a Pro Tour win, many people anticipated an uptick in Lantern Control‘s metagame share, but I’m fairly certain that the difficulty and atypical kind of Magic the deck presents to the pilot will always keep the deck well under 5%. I feel okay facing this matchup one out of more than twenty matches.

In the case of the Hexproof deck, I believe reality caught up with the deck. While it’s very good in many metagames on paper, the deck is very high variance, especially in a long tournament like a Grand Prix. Hats off to Dan Ward for taking down the Grand Prix last weekend (by the way, go read the interview I did with him if you haven’t already), but I don’t expect many copies of Gladecover Scout in various top 8’s in the coming months. That being said, if we continue to see more and more Burn and various Control decks at the top tables, I’m willing to revisit this strategy again and try and to either fix or live with the consistency issues.

Three Checkmarks

For my next Modern tournament, I will try to earn the following checkmarks to feel good about my deck choice:

Be even-good against Burn.

The format is still too big to play dedicated hate cards against them, but Lightning Helix, Collective Brutality, Dispel and/or a good manabase will get you a long way.

Be even-good against Tron.

The four copies of Tron in the Grand Prix Lyon top 8 can’t be ignored. You accomplish this by playing a very fast strategy or finding a way to freeroll a land destruction plan into your deck. Spreading Seas, Field of Ruin and Ghost Quarter, while Ceremonious Rejection and Stony Silence are great sideboard options.

Be even-good against Jace.

Play fast creatures, play creature lands with three power, play a combo deck that will win on the spot if they tap out, operate at instant speed with Collected Company or flash creatures, or play value creatures with great enter the battlefield triggers. The options are many, thankfully.

Thank you so much for reading about my thoughts. Which checkmarks are you aiming for in the beginning of the format?

Meet the Pros: Paulo Vitor Damo Da Rosa

Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa
Nicknames PVDDR, Pablo Doritos
Born September 29, 1987 (age 30)
Porto AlegreBrazil
Residence Porto AlegreBrazil
Nationality Brazil Brazil
Pro Tour debut 2003 World Championships – Berlin
Winnings $439,135[1]
Pro Tour wins (Top 8) 2 (12)[2]
Grand Prix wins (Top 8) 2 (19)[3]
Lifetime Pro Points 588[4]
Planeswalker Level 50 (Archmage)
source mtg.gamepedia.com

Hello Paulo and welcome to the spotlight! It’s a pleasure to have you. I want to talk a little about the conditions as a Brazilian compared to privileged Europeans and Americans with Grand Prix in their backyard every month. With very expensive plane tickets and bad internet (maybe that’s a cliche?), how did you manage to break through? Also please add a key moment or two that you think back on with great joy that sparked your career.

The internet is just fine, but the plane tickets being expensive thing is very real. It’s not only that they’re expensive, but every trip is a big journey – there’s no “leave Friday arrive Monday” kind of thing, you have to commit to every tournament. A trip to an US Grand Prix, for example, takes about 20 hours each way for me, and costs about $1200. If I top 8 the tournament but lose in the quarters, I’m still down money. That’s not even mentioning things like visas, which we need and aren’t easy to get.

I managed to break through due to a combination of trying very hard and being really lucky. I had very supportive parents, and I was able to do well in my first couple of tries, which gave me the qualification and the resources for future ones. For South Americans, there aren’t many chances – you play in one or two major tournaments in a year, so if you don’t do well, that’s it, you might never qualify again. I managed to do well in a lot of them in a row, so I got to the Platinum equivalent of the Pro Player’s Club, which enabled me to continue playing the following year.

more than 10 years ago: PVDDR at Worlds 2006 in Paris

I think there were two key moments that sparked my career; the first was my first Pro Tour, Worlds 2003 in Berlin. I managed to finish in the top 64, which gave me a prize money of around $500, which was a lot of money for a 15 year old Brazilian kid. It showed me that there was more to the game than I originally expected, and opened up a lot of new possibilities.

The second was my first PT top 8, Charleston 2006. It showed me that I could actually do this thing professionally, that I was good enough.

Your resumé speaks for itself and being inducted in the Hall of Fame in 2012 seems like the peak in any Magic player’s career, but you still keep posting strong results and show a lot of love for the game. Talk about your continued motivation and if being considered the G.O.A.T (greatest of all time) is on your bucket list.


This might be unusual regarding Magic players, but my motivation has never been to be the best – I just want to be happy. I enjoy the lifestyle of a Magic player – waking up whenever I want, practicing for as long as I want, not answering to anyone but myself, getting to meet my friends.

My goal has always been to be able to do that while supporting me and my family. As long as this continues being the case, I’ll be happy, regardless of whether people consider me the best or not. In the end, no one can truly judge skill, so who can tell who the best players are?

Titles such as “best player in the world” have always seemed a bit hollow to me because of that. Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy to be in the conversation, but it’s not my goal to be considered the best because I know it’s just very arbitrary. Right now, I couldn’t tell you who the best player in the world is – I couldn’t even give you three names. I could, maybe, give you a list of 15 players who could all be the best player in a given tournament. I like being in that list, but do not make my goal to be number one.

The one title that still motivates me is World Champion, which is the one I don’t have. I’d really like to be World Champion at some point.

We initially got in contact on Twitter because of a question of mine in the Christian Calcano interview quoting Andrea Mengucci about team tournaments, and you said that the vast majority of professional players love team events. Can you elaborate on that statement?

Pro players like team events for two reasons. First, they’re fun – you are playing with friends, you share their victories and their defeats. Team Sealed is different from normal Sealed, and I believe it’s even more interesting to build. Overall I enjoy myself more if I’m at a team event than at an individual event.

Second, they mitigate the impact of variance and non-games. If you’re in an individual event and you mulligan to five twice, that’s it, you’re done for the round. If it’s a team event, you can mulligan to five twice and still win because your teammates win. If you’re a team of 3 good players, then your edge is bigger in a team event. Couple that with the fact that team sealed is very hard to build properly, and you have some very stacked team sealed top 4’s.

Paulo’s Team: ChannelFireball Ice from last year

In the past I recall you saying that you really dislike Magic Online and that you prefer to test in real life. With more time to draft the newest set before a Pro Tour online than previous, is this still how you prefer to prepare for a Pro Tour or did you adapt to keep up with the young and hungry MTGO grinders?

I still prefer to not play Magic Online, but I’ve had to adapt to the times. We’ve been meeting in person for less time than we did before, and with the set available on modo right after the pre-release, it’s just more convenient to do drafts on MTGO rather than trying to coordinate live ones. I don’t enjoy playing it as much but I feel like I have to do it.

Legacy will be played at the Pro Tour for the first time this year, and Modern is back after a few years break. Share your thoughts on those formats respectively, and could you see your self playing Legacy at professional level?

I love Legacy as a format – I think it’s diverse but the gameplay is also intricate. Every small decision in Legacy matters – what land you play, what land you fetch, what spell you play, how you resolve it. In Standard and Modern, you often just have scripted plays – you’ll play your second land and then your two drop. In Legacy, every tiny variable changes what you’re supposed to do, and I really enjoy that.

I’ve played Legacy at a professional level many times before – I’ve played multiple Legacy Grand Prixs, and I’ve also played it at the World Team event some years ago, so I can definitely see myself playing it at the Pro Tour.

Grand Prix Paris 2014 Quarterfinals: PVDDR is on Miracles


It’ll be interesting to see whether Legacy actually stands the scrutiny of being a Pro Tour format – it being teams will probably help with this a little bit. In a Grand Prix, people just play whatever they want, what they like or what they have access to; in a Pro Tour, everyone will be bringing in the deck they feel is the very best. This could make everyone converge in one dominating deck and actually have a lasting negative impact on the format, but I’m hoping this won’t be the case.

As for Modern, I think it’s by a wide margin the worst competitive format of all. There are about 25 decks you can play, but they are very polarised in matchup and the gameplay is completely random.

Did you draw your sideboard hate? Well, you can’t lose now.

Did you not draw it? Well, you can’t win.

A lot of matchups are just two decks goldfishing against each other or trying to draw their sideboard cards, and it’s not fun being on either side of that exchange. Since there are many many decks, you cannot even sideboard against all of them, and, since every deck is 7%, you’re not actually supposed to.

For example, should I make my deck beat Dredge when I know Dredge is 7% of the field and it’ll hurt me in other matchups?

Likely not, but then I can just get paired vs Dredge twice and my tournament is over.

Now apply this to Storm, Tron, Living End, Ad Nauseam, Infect, Affinity, Goryo’s, Through the Breach… you’ll always get to a point where you have to give up beating something, and then it becomes a pairing roulette.

Editorial Note: Modern is known for linear decks.


You had a very good season last year and went out with a bang winning the Pro Tour in Japan this summer. What are the goals for Paulo this season?

PV’S HOUR OF GLORY: Paulo winning Pro Tour Hours of Devastation

My goal is mostly to do well enough that I can continue doing what I do, which usually means getting to the Platinum level in the Pro Players Club. As far as more precise goals, I’d really like to win Worlds or Team Worlds.

Lastly, feel free to link to your sponsors, leave your Twitter handle or whatever you like.

Thank you so much for taking the time for this interview out of your busy schedule!

No problem 🙂 My twitter handle is @pvddr and you can find my weekly articles on www.channelfireball.com.

Beating Modern #4

Welcome back to the fourth and last edition of “Beating Modern“. The decks are becoming more and more fringe, which is why I’m rounding off the series today. It sure has been a pleasure with a project like this, and I will gladly take suggestions for a similar one in the future!


Black/White Eldrazi Taxes

Aether Vial

This deck is trying to borrow the blueprint from Death and Taxes in Legacy, using resource denial and respectable beats to win the game. In a deck with only 4 Aether Vial and 4 Path to Exile as non-creature spells, Thalia, Guardian of Thraben is a great hatebear, and Leonin Arbiter lets the deck abuse Ghost Quarter while also disrupting opposing fetch lands and various tutors. With an active Aether Vial on three, Flickerwisp can do a lot of tricks which I will tough on later. Wasteland Stranger synergizes with Tidehollow Sculler, Flickerwisp and Path to Exile and can do nasty things to you if you are creature-based. The double team of Tidehollow Sculler and Thought-Knot Seer combined with Thalia makes sure that piloting a spell-based combo deck against Eldrazi Taxes can be bad news. In the later turns, Eldrazi Taxes wants to abuse Eldrazi Displacer for either recycling all of their enter the battlefield triggers or clearing opposing blockers.

When playing against this deck and your opponent plays his Tidehollow Sculler and takes your best card, it is very important that you don’t think to your self “no worries, I will just get my card back in a few turns when I draw a removal spell” because Wasteland Strangler can return the exiled card to your graveyard for good.

Another key to getting an edge in the matchup is understanding Flickerwisp. You should pay attention to your opponents body language to try and get information. Furthermore, if you plan on pointing a removal spell on your one of your opponent’s creatures with the fear of Flickerwisp lurking, play it on his upkeep to minimize his chances of having it (compared to the attack step), so the Flickerwisp and the targeted creature at least can not attack you that turn. In some scenarios you want your opponent to commit a big attack, and thus you should wait to set up the trap. Consider all of these options when facing Vial on three.

Maybe the most important thing I can tell you is to use your fetch lands early and often. Get them out of the way, so Leonin Arbiter does not disrupt you more than necessary. This can also mean that shocking your self without having a play is often correct, so you have two open mana in case Leonin Arbiter + Ghost Quarter happen.

The deck is super resilient, and there aren’t really any good sideboard cards in particular except various mass removal spells.

Good Sideboard Cards


Ad Nauseam

Ad Nauseam

This is a non-interactive combo deck that tried to win the game with either Angel’s Grace or Phyrexian Unlife combined with Ad Nauseam to draw their whole deck and finish off the opponent with Lightning Storm or Laboratory Maniac. It utilizes Lotus Bloom and Pentad Prism as acceleration and a smattering of cantrips to find its’ combo pieces. Throw in a free counterspell in Pact of Negation, and you have a deck that forces the opponent to have very specific cards at a certain time or just lose the game. Let’s see how we can exploit some of the deck’s weaknesses.

Ad Nauseam once was a very bad choice when Infect was a top dog in Modern because of Angel’s Grace and Phyrexian Unlife‘s inability to combat poison-based damage. Now, their enemy number one is Grixis Death’s Shadow because of their fast clock and big pile of disruption. The nature of the deck dictates that timely discard spells and cheap counter magic are great ways to beat it. However, you also need to establish a relevant clock unless you want the Ad Nauseam player to claw back into the game. This also means that Black/Green Midrange is a great strategy for beating Ad Nauseam thanks to discard spells and Tarmogoyf.

Consistency issues are also a real concern, so expect to win a game here and there where they just don’t find their copy of Ad Nauseam. This problem should improve with Opt available to them as cantrips 9-12.

Most versions will play Leyline of Sanctity in the sideboard, so make sure that all your eggs in the basket are not discard spells, or you could find your self in a lot of trouble before the game even begins.

Speaking of Leyline of Sanctity, because of Laboratory Maniac, that card does little to nothing against Ad Nauseam. Neither does getting infinite life or dropping a Pithing Needle or Phyrexian Revoker naming “Lightning Storm“. Note that the Laboratory Maniac kill is a bit more mana intensive, since they need to filter red mana from Simian Spirit Guide into colored mana for their Pentad Prisms, and then play Laboratory Maniac and Serum Visions to win the game. In this scenario, cards like Lightning Bolt and Path to Exile on the Maniac do nothing because they have drawn their whole deck and will have Pact of Negation available.

Good Sideboard Cards

Dispel

Rule of Law


Green/X Tron

Karn Liberated

The old version of Tron has fallen a bit out of favour lately, but it’s still a relevant deck to prepare for when entering a huge Modern event like Danish Modern Masters. Modern is a beautiful format with a lot of appeal to players who don’t necessarily play Magic every week, because they can pull out their trusty pet deck from the closet and still be competitive. Tron is a perfect example of this and should not be underestimated.

Tron is a simple deck that aims to have one of each Urza land in play to get a mana advantage over its’ opponent and keep playing big threats until the game is over. The industry standard these days are a playset of Karn Liberated and a split of Wurmcoil Engine, World Breaker; Ugin, the Spirit Dragon and Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger. The split of threats offers flexibility and covers the most angles for the deck. Karn is your best play from turn three Tron, Wurmcoil Engine provides lifegain and laughs in the face of non-Path to Exile removal, while Ugin will sweep the board and Ulamog will end the game a majority of the time. Instead of focusing on dealing with the threats of the deck, I suggest we attack the manabase.

Some decks have Ghost Quarter or Spreading Seas in their deck already and that adds valuable percentages to your game ones vs. Tron. Note that a good Tron player can play around Tectonic Edge by only sitting on the three Urza lands, and that a Ghost Quarter on the battlefield can “counter” your Crumble to Dust. There is nothing you can do about these things – this is just a friendly reminder of situations that will come up.

Aside from attacking the lands themselves, Tron can be beaten if your deck is resilient to their threats. Take Splinter Twin back in the day as an example. Splinter Twin didn’t care too much about neither Karn Liberated nor Wurmcoil Engine and thus was heavily favoured against Tron. Decks with Path to Exile and a lot of creatures, like Humans, can somewhat ignore the same two, but will lose the game to Ugin and Oblivion Stone when the opponent hits eight mana. The best strategy against Tron is presenting a fast kill, ideally disrupting them in the process. Grixis Death’s Shadow is very good at establishing a clock with Thoughtseize or Stubborn Denial backup, and that should do the trick most of the time. Affinity and Burn also have great Tron matchups because of their speed and tools like creature lands and anti-lifegain cards.

Keep in mind that almost 1/3 of their deck are artifacts with activated abilities, so Stony Silence is a great addition to your anti-Tron arsenal.

Good Sideboard Cards

Stony SilenceFulminator MageCrumble to Dust


That does it for my Beating Modern series unless I come up with three more relevant decks one of the following days. I will make sure that next week’s article will also be relevant for Modern!