Beating Modern #1

Hello and welcome back, this time for the first piece of an article series about Modern! Three at a time, I will be running through the most popular Modern decks out there and tell you how to beat them in your next Modern tournament. Feel free to add more tips and tricks in the comments! Also, you can skip the prologue and go straight to the matchup guides if you live outside of Germany and the Nordic countries.

Prologue

This article series is brought to you by Snapcardster and a Danish union called “Eternal Magic Kbh“. The union started out many years ago with the intentions to play a lot of Legacy and make great tournaments for the mature audience who were not very interested in Standard. Once or twice a year, around 100 players gathered in Copenhagen to play in “Danish Legacy Masters“, and the events were always a huge success. A few years ago, Modern was added as a supported format as a reaction to the high demand and broad audience of the format. Because of the support from the state, these tournaments have way better prizes than normal tournaments at your local game store.

Because I love watching the Danish tournament scene grow, and I am privileged to be a part of Snapcardster, I had to use this amazing platform to recommend this tournament to anyone within a reasonable reach of Copenhagen. I know many players from Germany, Sweden and Norway have previously visited this tournament and always had a great time – sometimes even brought back the crown and made some friendly rivalries along the way.

You can find the event information about “Danish Modern Masters”, which is also a PPTQ, here.


Grixis Death’s Shadow

This deck is a tempo deck most of the time, but don’t underestimate its’ ability to grind with the best of them using Kolaghan’s Command and Snapcaster Mage – especially together. Its’ low land count make it possible to gain virtual card advantage over a long game of Magic where the opponent will naturally draw more lands, assuming they play more than 18-19. Also expect to face both versions of Liliana after the new planeswalker rule is in effect.

You want targeted removal spells and lots of it to beat it, preferably paired with Snapcaster Mage. Fatal Push, Engineered Explosives and Abrupt Decay do nothing against the delve creatures, and Death’s Shadow can live through Dismember some percentage of the time, while Path to Exile and Terminate do the job against all of their threats.

Death’s Shadow is weak to heavy boardstate decks like Abzan Company, Affinity and Humans because of their ability to race and deal a lot of damage out of nowhere. Similarly, if you are playing Burn, don’t Lava Spike them for three every turn. Instead you should aim to do large chunks of damage in a few turns to limit the number of big attacks from Death’s Shadow. Some games Death’s Shadow will take advantage of the small damage you are dealing them and stop the last lethal burn spell with a timely Stubborn Denial or two. Don’t play into their lifeloss plan at their pace.


Sideboard Options


Affinity

Affinity is an aggressive deck looking to win the game via the combat step. Most of their cards are not very impressive on their own, but synergize very well. You will be taking advantage of that in your quest to beat them.

The deck is composed of bad cards and payoff cards, with the payoff cards being: Cranial Plating, Arcbound Ravager, Steel Overseer, Master of Etherium and to some extent Etched Champion and Signal Pest. If you manage to deal with these, you will win the game most of the time. Don’t Spell Snare a Vault Skirge, don’t Fatal Push a Memnite, and don’t Thoughtseize a Galvanic Blast.

Arcbound Ravager is a very complicated card to play against. Just like the Affinity player, you have to do exact math and be aware of each and every modular option at their disposal. I like killing the Ravager early to make them make a decision about additional +1/+1 counters, and some people like having the removal spell at the ready when your opponent goes all in. Find your style and stick to it.

The eight creature lands of the deck represent a very effective angle of attack, so always pay close attention to which Nexus they are sitting on. You can die from poison out of nowhere from either Ravager’s modular or the double black costed activated ability on Cranial Plating, and the Blinkmoth Nexus can pump even Inkmoth.

Keep an eye out for Blood Moon out of their sideboard if you happen to play a deck that is weak to it.


Sideboard Options


Burn

A very linear deck with one simple goal: reduce your opponent’s life total to 0 as fast as possible using hasty creatures and direct burn spells. While dedicated lifegain, Kitchen Finks and Lightning Helix for instance, is great for obvious reasons, let us talk about other ways to get an edge in the matchup.

First of all, your mana base is super important. Some decks can afford to run a lot of basics and fastlands (Spirebluff Canal and its’ friends), and this is a great start to beating Burn – actually forcing them to do the full twenty damage to you. You need to watch out though, because sometimes fetching a basic instead of shockland will cost you tempo and there for indirectly life in the long run. That brings me to the next point.

You need to establish a clock against Burn and not give them too many draw steps to find enough gas to finish you off. Delve creatures, Tarmogoyf, Master of Etherium, Thought-Knot Seer and Reality Smasher are all great at pressuring their life total at a fast pace.

Because Burn needs a critical mass of relevant cards, one-for-one answers are good against it. Spell Snare‘ing an Eidolon of the Great Revel, Fatal Push‘ing a Goblin Guide or Inquisition of Kozilek‘ing away a Boros Charm are all great plays that improve your odds of beating it. The more you trade spells one for one with the deck, the more firmly you put your self in the driver seat.

Sideboard Options

Please share all the inside information you have about the above decks. Sharing knowledge is power! Thank you all for reading, and I’ll see you next time where I cover three more decks you can be sure to face in your next Modern event!

If you want more Modern action, tune in to my twitch channel and follow me on twitter!

Grand Prix Las Vegas Modern Analysis

Three Grand Prix were held this weekend in Las Vegas, and today I will talk about what happened in the Modern portion.

With 3,264 (!!!) participants and Modern in a balanced place compared to the eras of Eldrazis, blue delve cards, Grave-Trolls and Probes, the stage was set for an epic tournament. Keeping in mind that you needed a record of 13-2 or even better because of the size of this tournament, here are the top 8 decks that survied the swiss portion:

3 Affinity
1 Mono White Hatebears
1 Green/White Hatebears
1 Burn
1 Blue/Black Turns
1 Eldrazi Tron

If you showed me this list prior to the tournament, I would simply have laughed at you and told you how bad positioned Affinity is, how great Death’s Shadow is and how underpowered Leonin Arbiter decks are in a world of combo decks.


Good as usual or good again?

Let’s start by addressing the three copies of Affinity in the top 8. Every time a single deck puts three copies into any top 8 in Modern specifically, it’s bound to draw attention. I’ve heard a bunch of chatter from good players about how all the focus would be on Death’s Shadow variants this weekend, and that people would prioritize other cards than Stony Silence and artifact removal spells for their sideboards, and it makes a lot of sense that Affinity was able to capitalize on that. In the end of today’s article, I talk to the champion, Mani Davoudi, about how he experienced his triumph and weekend in general.


The hero we deserve?

Hatebear strategies have always been tier 2 in Modern unless played by Craig Wescoe, but maybe this has changed without me noticing it. Flooding the board with resilient and disruptive creatures certainly is a great strategy vs. Death’s Shadow. Packing a card like Mirran Crusader really underlines that fact that Lighting Bolt is seeing next to no play at the moment. Back in the day, you could never play with three drops that died to Lightning Bolt, so this is a very metagame specific choice.


Lucky or good?

Going forward, this is not something I would recommend to anyone. Daniel Wong did a great job piloting this deck all the way to the quarter finals, even tuning his deck to have a chance vs. Death’s Shadow with the black splash and Chalice of the Void in the sideboard, but the strategy is too clunky and fragile in a world of fast clocks backed up by discard spells. Hats off to him – his pet deck got him a Pro Tour invite and some dollars on top of it!

Top 8 decklists: http://magic.wizards.com/en/events/coverage/gplv17-modern/top-8-decklists-2017-06-18
In the top 32 we see a lot of familiar faces that you can usually expect to do well at any Modern tournament, but I want to talk about a few of the more unorthodox decks among the top finishers.

In 12th place, also going 13-2 and qualifying to the Pro Tour, Warren Woodward piloted a very interesting Black/White midrange deck focused around planeswalkers and powerful synergies with Smallpox. Smallpox is symmetric on the surface, but is a devastating card when it takes a land, creature and card in hand from the opposition while you sacrifice a Bloodghast and Flagstones of Trokair while discarding a Lingering Souls or another Bloodghast from your hand. Liliana of the Veil is also very lopsided in this deck for the same reasons. Combine the fact that Lingering Souls was very well positioned this weekend this the black skeleton of pointed discard spells and cheap removal, and he made a recipe for success that paid off.

Since Faeries added both Bitterblossom and Ancestral Vision to their arsenal, it has been lurking around the bush and preparing its attack on the metagame. Faeries has a good game plan vs. combo decks, control decks and is also decent against Death’s Shadow variants, partly thanks to Spellstutter Sprite. The setup with Liliana of the Veil combined with counterspells is rarely seen, but I imagine the powerlevel and versatility of Liliana was hard to turn down for Yuta Takahashi. Somewhat recent printings of 4 Collective Brutality and 3 Ceremonious Rejection in his sideboard are there to shore up Burn, Tron and Affinity – three matchups Faeries has struggled with traditionally – which makes a lot of sense to me.

Lastly, a copy of Big Zoo made it into the top 32 in the hands of Robert Maes. Robert plays the expected manadorks, beef and a few silverbullets and 4 Collected Company and some removal spells in a pretty straight forward list. With the three copies of Seal of Fire, a Shock-type card used to boost up his own Tarmogoyf and kill opposing small creatures, he is rather spell heavy compared to other Company decks, which makes room for 26 creatures. In the sideboard he tries to solve some unfair matchups that his deck naturally struggles against with cards like Thalia, Guardian of Thraben, Stony Silence, Tormod’s Crypt, Eidolon of Retoric and Blood Moon. What I dislike about this archetype is that it feels too fair and puts too much pressure on finding your sideboard cards in games 2 and 3, and mulliganning away perfectly servicable hands in search of those will probably happen a bit too often to my taste.

Check all decklists from 9-32th here: http://magic.wizards.com/en/events/coverage/gplv17/9-32-decklists-2017-06-18

As promised, here is an interview with the Grand Prix Las Vegas Champion 2017, Mani Davoudi!

Hello Mani and huge congratulations on your accomplishment this weekend, and thank you very much for taking time to sit down with me.
Hey Andreas, thank you very much and no problem!

When I met you back in Vancouver in 2015 for Pro Tour Origins, you seemed like a Limited specialist at heart. Did I completely misjudge you, and you’re actually just a Modern Master waiting for the perfect moment to strike?
No, your read was right. After GP Vegas 2015 where I had a 9-0 start before crashing in day 2, I decided it was time for a break from competitive magic and devoting all my efforts to qualifying for the pro tour. A natural part of playing less magic was when I did play, it would usually be limited as it was easier to play on magic online without keeping up with the format. I certainly wouldn’t consider myself a modern master by any means, but I have played a fair bit of affinity over the years and consider myself proficient with the deck.

With Death’s Shadow being the number one deck in Modern right now, even though by a very small margin, did this matter when you picked your deck for the event? Talk a little about the Affinity vs. Grixis Death’s Shadow matchup.
Regarding Death’s Shadow and whether it affected my deck choice, I would say it did indirectly. When the week started, I was not intending in playing this Grand Prix. After 0-3 and dropping from the Limited Grand Prix, I was feeling a little disappointed about my quick exit. I joined Gerry Thompson and Sam Black in the middle of a conversation they were having about Death’s Shadow and what the right deck choice for the weekend was. Sam mentioned he thought Affinity was well positioned, and Gerry agreed. This caught my interest, seeing as it was the only deck I had any experience with, and after a little consideration and effort put into tracking down a copy of the deck to borrow, I was registered for the GP.
As for the matchup, I wouldn’t be able to tell you. In theory and from speaking to others, the matchup seems to be in affinitys favour but I had not played it heading into the GP, and I did not face it a single time in the tournament itself.

You took a fairly stock version of Affinity all the way to the 1st place in this 3500 people tournament. Rank these three factors for you winning the whole tournament and explain why: Affinity was under the radar this weekend. You played great. Variance.
1. Variance. Over the course of the weekend, I played very few decks packing great hate for affinity/bad matchups, I played no “professional” players, and I drew quite well. The fact that I won the finals on a mulligan to 4 speaks for itself.
2. Affinity was under the radar. I felt like overall people were not quite ready for affinity, and had shifted their sideboard priorities to deal with other matchups.
3. I played great. While I do think I managed to keep it together and avoid making egregious mistakes, I’m not sure if I played great. I would say I played better than my opponents in most of my matches.

You only had one loss the whole weekend. Tell us a few words about that match if you remember.
In round 13 of the tournament, I finally played against the only other undefeated player, Theau Mery on mono white hatebears. It was not a very interesting match, as I had a great affinity draw game 1 that resulted in a turn 2 or 3 concession, and then he played turn 2 Stony Silence in both post board games. Unfortunately that’s the nature of the matchup, and I’m glad I got the better end of it when I got my rematch in the finals.

For the readers who didn’t hear your winning interview, walk us through that mulligan to four(!!!) in the deciding game.
In game 2 of the finals, Theau immediately kept his 7 card hand on the play. This made me believe that the chances of him having a Stony Silence were very high. On my end, both my 7 and 6 card hands had no mana sources and were unkeepable. My 5 card hand was Mox Opal, Ornithopter, Spring Leaf Drum, Cranial Plating, and Steel Overseer. I briefly considered keeping the hand as it had explosive potential with a lucky scry, but ultimately I decided that if my read of Stony Silence was correct, I could not win with that hand and was better off trying to find my wear/tear on a mulligan to 4. As it turned out, he DID have the Stony Silence, but had kept a one lander and missed his second land for a few turns, allowing me to get a Cranial Plating on an Etched Champion steal the game.

Thank you so much for stopping by and best of luck at the Pro Tour. You did it, buddy!
Thanks for having me! People can follow me on twitter or twitch @Zapgaze. I’d also like to thank Sam Black for (inadvertently) inspiring me to play, Stephen Barnett for getting the deck together for me at 5 in the morning, and all of my friends for their amazing support.

 

Make sure to follow Andreas Petersen on twitter and tune in to his twitch channel to get more great Magic content!