Beating Legacy #1

November 5th there is a huge Legacy tournament in Copenhagen called “Danish Legacy Masters“. As this is a tournament with great tradition and players coming in from not only all parts of Denmark, but also from Sweden and Germany, I can’t wait to play.

I have four top 8‘s with one win and one finals split in this tournament series over the years, and I’m hoping to add to my resume this time around. But I’m getting way ahead of me because in order to win, you need to prepare! So tag along as I try and break down the most relevant decks to prepare for. Welcome to “Beating Legacy“!

Storm

Storm uses Dark Ritual, Cabal Ritual, Lotus Petal and Lion’s Eye Diamond to accelerate out Ad Nauseam or Past in Flames either natural drawn or found with Infernal Tutor. The tutor makes sure you can end your turn by searching up a lethal Tendrils of Agony. To clear the way of pesky counter magic, a total number of 6 or 7 Cabal Therapy and Duress are included.

Some opening hands allow for quick kills where others need to set up a later kill with the numerous cantrips. Gitaxian Probe provides free information about the opponent’s hand, while Brainstorm and Ponder do their usual job of digging for what you need.

In order to give yourself the best chance of beating Storm, you need to fight them on several axis. In my experience, if you can attack Storm on at least two of the following areas, you are in good shape:

1) Clock. The faster you can get them low on life, the better. The damage also interacts favorably with Ad Nauseam.
2) Counter magic. Counterspells are good, and Flusterstorm is the best of the bunch.
3) Discard spells. Going for their hand is good for obvious reasons and provides information on how to play out your hand.
4) Graveyard hate. Attacking the graveyard means that Ad Nauseam or Empty the Warrens are their only path to victory.
5) Hateful permanents. They will only have a few answers to permaments in their deck, so getting one into play around their discard spells is important.


Grixis Delver

Many color combinations of Delver decks have come and gone through the years, but in 2017 it’s all about Grixis. Deathrite Shaman is too good not to play and needs black mana, and your removal spell of choice – Lightning Bolt – can finish off players and still kill most of the creatures in the format. Furthermore, red offers some great sideboard options while also adding Young Pyromancer to the threat base. Speaking of which, their different threats can’t be dealt with by the same cards, so keep that in mind.

They usually run a full playset of Deathrite Shaman and Delver of Secrets and then a mix of Young Pyromancer, Gurmag Angler and True-Name Nemesis. While Fatal Push and Lightning Bolt take care of the first two, and True-Name and Pyromancer die to various -1/-1 effects, the Angler is very resilient to non-Swords to Plowshares removal. The difficulty of dealing with its creatures is one of the deck’s greatest strengths.

Playing and hopefully winning against Grixis Delver demands that you can navigate around some of their most important disruptive cards. Let’s go through them one by one.

“Can I afford to play around Wasteland?” is the most important question you have to ask your self. I’ve seen my share of players who played around Wasteland and as a result weren’t able to cast all of their spells. Don’t be that guy. Sometimes you need to make them have it and power through it, and sometimes you need to bridge a gap between two turns where you are immune to Wasteland. Storm and Sneak and Show are the most common decks for these situations with turn 1 basic Island and a cantrip.

Daze raises different questions than Wasteland, but they have their similarities. Early in the game you have to take stand to whether you can play around Daze all game or you’re going to run into it eventually. Keep in mind though, that waiting one turn to boost your odds of resolving a spell can backfire against a tempo deck like Grixis Delver. Wasteland, Cabal Therapy and Force of Will from the top of their library can punish you for sandbagging spells in fear of Daze, so I suggest you cast your spells on curve the majority of the time unless it’s a crucial one.

Playing around Cabal Therapy can be a few things. You need a lot of knowledge about what your opponent is most likely to name depending on the situation, which can be very hard. You should make sure not to have two of the same card in hand if you can avoid it. Aside from Brainstorm and Ponder, another way to do this is playing out the card you have two copies of if you have to decide between two spells for the turn. For example, if you have two Thalia, Guardian of Thraben and one Stoneforge Mystic in hand, chances are you should be playing out the Thalia regardless of what the best play would be in respect of the Therapy.

Stifle in combination with Wasteland can really mess up your plans. In some scenarios, fetching out a nonbasic before the opponent has mana for Stifle, even though they run 4 Wasteland, can be the correct play. Sometimes you need to play out fetch lands and cast no spells and make your opponent keep up the mana long enough for the Stifle to be irrelevant or until they decide to make a move. Since they run relatively few lands, chances are that they will not be able to advance the board while keeping up Stifle. Be proactive if you don’t have the ability to keep making land drops or wait it out – your deck will typically be better in the long game.

That will do it for the first installment of Beating Legacy. Next week I will be back with some more tips and tricks for a few relevant Legacy matchups. In the meantime please add your best advice for beating Storm and Grixis Delver in the comments on facebook, twitter, reddit or where ever you are reading this.

Legacy is All About Leovold

For those of you who have been living under a rock for the last six months, I can tell you that the “best” deck in Legacy is a four-colored control deck in which you can play any non-white card. The deck plays a lot of powerful cards, and its’ goal is to prolong the game so the superior card quality can take over – kind of like how “Jund” was looked at in Modern a few years back. Today I’m going to analyze what having 4 Color Control at the top of the metagame percentages means for the format.

Why is 4 Color Control a popular choice?

First things first. This deck’s game plan appeals to a lot of good players because they get to play a long game of Magic and gain small advantages here and there which ultimately gives you a higher chance of winning the game. When taking a look at the following list, which is not only a list of awesome Magic, but also the core of 4 Color Leovold, you suddenly understand why players want to play this deck.



Metagame reactions caused by 4 Color Control

The dreaded Black/Red Reanimator that was all the rage to start the year has slowly disappeared from the format thanks to too many decks starting off the game with Deathrite Shaman. I guess 4 Color Control can only take the blame partially for this one.

My team mate and Death & Taxes specialist Michael Bonde said on Skype the other day that Kolaghan’s Command has pushed his favorite deck all the way to the edge of playability and that every time he beats 4 Color Control, he feels like the luckiest man on the planet.

People tried their hardest to come up with a playable Blood Moon deck to fight the heavy amount of nonbasic lands in the format. Maybe this Chandra deck is the answer?

Grixis Delver players started experimenting with grindy sideboard plans that included Kolaghan’s Command and Painful Truths among other typical controllish cards.Nic Fit, a Green/Black/X based ramp built around Veteran Explorer and Cabal Therapy synergies, has started to pick up steam lately. In a world where Swords to Plowshares is running rampant, the Explorer simply is not a playable Magic card.

The only answer for this card out of 4 Color Control is usually Force of Will and possibly a singleton Abrupt Decay, which is good news. Having Sylvan Library in play will generate a ton of card advantage because you don’t really care about your life total when playing against 4 Color Control. Most of their cards create card advantage, and now you can fight on even terms instead of bringing a knife to a gunfight. This card’s stock is way up these days.

Green/Black Turbo Depths, which only route to victory is the 20/20 indestructive Marit Lage token, is a natural predator of 4 Color Control due to the lack of exile-based removal. In a world of Wasteland and Terminus, this deck was hardly a factor.

Some Delver pilots switched to a more burn-heavy version playing only Blue and Red to punish the mana base of 4 Color Control with Price of Progress.

Lately I’ve been playing against a few Eldrazi decks, but I don’t have enough data to call it a metagame reaction. One thing is for sure: if that deck is climbing to 5% of the metagame, I will have to re-evaluate my removal suite to combat Reality Smasher better.

My Version of 4 Color Control – October 2017

Recently I played the deck to a top 4 finish at the weekly Legacy Challenge on Magic Online, and here is my list. Allow me to talk about a few interesting card choices.

I like two copies of Diabolic Edict in the deck mainly because of Gurmag Angler, True-Name Nemesis and the Marit Lage token. If your opponent Show and Tells a Griselbrand into play, the Edict can do great things combined with Leovold. This slot is definitely a hedge, because most of the time you will be spending two mana to kill a creature and wish it was a Fatal Push or Lightning Bolt.

This is fairly controversial, and those who follow my stream will know how I feel about this. Ponder is better in a deck where you are looking for specific cards and in decks where you play a low number of lands. However, in a deck with 20 or more lands like this one, I’m mostly looking to keep the engine running not looking for anything specific most of the time. The trade off is that you avoid the awkward situations where Ponder reveals one card you want and two cards you don’t want which leads to shuffling a lot of the time unless you have an uncracked fetch land at the ready. With Preordain you lose some potential upside, but you’re getting a much more consistent cantrip for your control deck. Needless to say, I suggest at least giving Preordain a try in this archetype.

I recently added a second copy of this effect, and it performed right from the start. Aside from the obvious function of dealing with Blood Moon, hasty creatures and a lethal Price of Progress, this little gem works wonders in the mirror match. In games two and three, Pyroblast play a huge role and looping Kolaghan’s Command with Snapcaster Mage is a great way to win a close game. Furthermore, you can counter opposing Sneak Attack or Burning Wish at a cheap cost.

Another great tool to fight the inevitable mirror match when entering a Legacy tournament. She can buy back your creatures that your opponent already spent resources killing, and she can ping Baleful Strix and Snapcaster Mage while ticking up. Not a lot of cards are worth using to deal with resolved Strixes and Snapcasters, but this Liliana qualifies. Making your life easier vs. Elves and Death & Taxes is just gravy.

Chandra has made her way into Legacy because she’s a house in the mirror. She dodges Pyroblast and can be very tough to deal with for the opponent unless they have a huge board presence or two burn spells in hand – something that is very hard to accomplish in the mirror match where you have basically the same cards. Deathrites getting killed, Hymn to Tourach both directions, Leovold or Jace, the Mind Sculptor being countered by Pyroblast is how a lot of games go. In these situations, Chandra will be a huge draw thanks to her ability to draw extra cards and deal with a single creature at the time. Maybe it’s off topic, but I won a game vs. Blood Moon thanks to her.

The rest of the list speaks for itself, but please feel free to ask if I missed something interesting.

I hope you guys enjoyed reading about my thought on 4 Color Control. If you have anything to add or think I’m telling lies, let me know in the comments and let’s have a great discussion!

In the coming weeks I will be publishing two or three articles about “Beating Legacy“, so make sure you don’t miss those.