Modern Pro Tour Recap

Hello there and welcome back. Today we have some fresh Modern data from the Pro Tour to look at, so let’s dive in! First of all, let’s have look at the metagame percentages recorded on Wizards‘ homepage.

Pro Tour Rivals of Ixalan metagame

The Archetype Breakdown – click to see full graph

 

Yeah, that’s an insane amount of diversity ranging from 1% to just below 10%. Going in, a lot of people were afraid that we would see a top heavy metagame with too many Tron lands and too many one mana 9/9’s, but those people sure got a pleasant surprise. The strength of Modern in a casual FNM and a competitive Grand Prix has always been the diversity, but at the professional level we have a tad more unstable track record until this Pro Tour. I think everyone from the players and spectators to Wizards them selves are beyond content with the outcome. My gut feeling is that Modern on the Pro Tour is here to stay this time.

The players who managed to win half of their matches or more on day one got to play 10 rounds of Modern total. Up next are the decks that managed to win eight or more matches, and there are a few sweet pieces of tech I would like to highlight.

2 Tron
2 Lantern Control
2 Grixis Shadow
Abzan Midrange
Blue/White Control
Bogles
Traverse Shadow
Grixis Control
Storm
Eldrazi Tron
Affinity
Burn
White/Black Eldrazi
Humans
Black/Red Hollow One

8-2 or better decklists

Unsurprisingly, Corey Burkhart sleeved up Grixis Control this event and managed to best eight of his ten opponents. Winning with controlling decks in Modern is no easy task, but he clearly got something right for this weekend. Looking at his decklist, you will notice he plays no less than 25 lands and a full playset of Field of Ruin. Traditionally, three-color control decks have had a horrible Tron matchup and no good way to fix this. Tectonic Edge was too much of a setback for their own gameplan, and no matter how many copies of Fulminator Mage you packed in your sideboard, the bad guys would always win.

Field of Ruin lets you disrupt Tron lands and Valakut, the Molten Pinnacle while not setting you back manawise in your mana hungry control deck deck. In a recorded deck tech from the Pro Tour, Corey said that cutting the Serum Visions was a great change because playing it looking for lands felt too clunky in a blazing fast format like Modern. For me, control is suddenly much more interesting because I can now almost freeroll a playable big mana matchup that used to be a huge concern.

Yet another Grixis deck, whose pilot decided that Serum Visions and Opt are too slow, is Ben Friedman with his Grixis Shadow deck. He added a playset of Mishra’s Bauble to make sure he hits his land drops, builds a graveyard for Gurmag Angler and gets a little free information along the way. This version of Death’s Shadow wants blue because of Stubborn Denial, Snapcaster Mage and the blue Dark Ritual (Corey’s reference to the synergy with delve spells) Thought Scour. Red adds Temur Battle Rage to close out combo decks or boardstate decks like Devoted Company and Affinity, but also some flexible sideboard cards in Kolaghan’s Command and Rakdos Charm. I really like this build instead of the traditional Grixis lists and the four color Traverse versions.

Looking at the top 8, we were blessed with seven different decks and a truck load of interesting matchups. When the dust settled, Luis Salvatto was standing tall with the trophy in one hand and his Lantern of Insight in the other. Huge congratulations to him! Here are the eight decks that battled on Sunday:

2 Humans
1 Lantern Control
1 Mardu Midrange
1 Blue/Red Control
1 Black/Red Hollow One
1 Abzan Midrange
1 Traverse Shadow

Top 8 decklists

In my preview before the tournament, I talked about how Izzet Control decks were not controlling enough to win without a combo and how all the combo options were bad. I even said that Izzet equals Blood Moon, but Pascal Vieren wouldn’t listen to that kind of nonsense. He ran the tables with his deadly duo of Young Pyromancer and Thing in the Ice all the way to the semi finals with a combination of Izzet cards we have not seen before.

Blue/Red Control by Pascal Vieren

Creatures (10)
Snapcaster Mage
Young Pyromancer
Thing in the Ice

Spells (28)
Serum Visions
Ancestral Vision
Roast
Opt
Lightning Bolt
Spell Snare
Abrade
Remand
Mana Leak
Electrolyze
Cryptic Command
Logic Knot
Lands (22)
Scalding Tarn
Flooded Strand
Misty Rainforest
Polluted Delta
Steam Vents
Spirebluff Canal
Sulfur Falls
Snow-Covered Island
Snow-Covered Mountain
Island
Field of Ruin

Sideboard (15)
Spell Snare
Abrade
Electrolyze
Anger of the Gods
Dispel
Negate
Ceremonious Rejection
Vendilion Clique
Relic of Progenitus
Disdainful Stroke
Molten Rain
Crumble to Dust

Note that he also incorporated Field of Ruin in his mana base and decided to diversify his win conditions, all of which synergize with his eight cantrips. For card advantage, Pascal hopes to suspend Ancestral Vision on turn one and use his many reactive cards to buy time until the last time counter is removed. Snapcaster Mage and Cryptic Command ensures that he has a superior lategame than most Modern decks, and from there closing out the game should be simple. I like the two copies of Roast to make sure he doesn’t die to the first Gurmag Angler or Tarmogoyf that hits the battlefield.

Bonus

We have the banned and restricted announcement coming up, and I just wanted to add my two cents on the matter. Bloodbraid Elf would be a welcome addition to Jund Midrange that has recently fallen out of favor and would incentivize some Big Zoo brewing and would possibly have players look into the Temur color combination trying to get lucky with a cascade into Ancestral Visions. Just make sure you don’t put too many counterspells in your deck in the case of Temur.

What was your favorite tech, play, moment or deck from the Pro Tour?

Beating Modern #1

Hello and welcome back, this time for the first piece of an article series about Modern! Three at a time, I will be running through the most popular Modern decks out there and tell you how to beat them in your next Modern tournament. Feel free to add more tips and tricks in the comments! Also, you can skip the prologue and go straight to the matchup guides if you live outside of Germany and the Nordic countries.

Prologue

This article series is brought to you by Snapcardster and a Danish union called “Eternal Magic Kbh“. The union started out many years ago with the intentions to play a lot of Legacy and make great tournaments for the mature audience who were not very interested in Standard. Once or twice a year, around 100 players gathered in Copenhagen to play in “Danish Legacy Masters“, and the events were always a huge success. A few years ago, Modern was added as a supported format as a reaction to the high demand and broad audience of the format. Because of the support from the state, these tournaments have way better prizes than normal tournaments at your local game store.

Because I love watching the Danish tournament scene grow, and I am privileged to be a part of Snapcardster, I had to use this amazing platform to recommend this tournament to anyone within a reasonable reach of Copenhagen. I know many players from Germany, Sweden and Norway have previously visited this tournament and always had a great time – sometimes even brought back the crown and made some friendly rivalries along the way.

You can find the event information about “Danish Modern Masters”, which is also a PPTQ, here.


Grixis Death’s Shadow

This deck is a tempo deck most of the time, but don’t underestimate its’ ability to grind with the best of them using Kolaghan’s Command and Snapcaster Mage – especially together. Its’ low land count make it possible to gain virtual card advantage over a long game of Magic where the opponent will naturally draw more lands, assuming they play more than 18-19. Also expect to face both versions of Liliana after the new planeswalker rule is in effect.

You want targeted removal spells and lots of it to beat it, preferably paired with Snapcaster Mage. Fatal Push, Engineered Explosives and Abrupt Decay do nothing against the delve creatures, and Death’s Shadow can live through Dismember some percentage of the time, while Path to Exile and Terminate do the job against all of their threats.

Death’s Shadow is weak to heavy boardstate decks like Abzan Company, Affinity and Humans because of their ability to race and deal a lot of damage out of nowhere. Similarly, if you are playing Burn, don’t Lava Spike them for three every turn. Instead you should aim to do large chunks of damage in a few turns to limit the number of big attacks from Death’s Shadow. Some games Death’s Shadow will take advantage of the small damage you are dealing them and stop the last lethal burn spell with a timely Stubborn Denial or two. Don’t play into their lifeloss plan at their pace.


Sideboard Options


Affinity

Affinity is an aggressive deck looking to win the game via the combat step. Most of their cards are not very impressive on their own, but synergize very well. You will be taking advantage of that in your quest to beat them.

The deck is composed of bad cards and payoff cards, with the payoff cards being: Cranial Plating, Arcbound Ravager, Steel Overseer, Master of Etherium and to some extent Etched Champion and Signal Pest. If you manage to deal with these, you will win the game most of the time. Don’t Spell Snare a Vault Skirge, don’t Fatal Push a Memnite, and don’t Thoughtseize a Galvanic Blast.

Arcbound Ravager is a very complicated card to play against. Just like the Affinity player, you have to do exact math and be aware of each and every modular option at their disposal. I like killing the Ravager early to make them make a decision about additional +1/+1 counters, and some people like having the removal spell at the ready when your opponent goes all in. Find your style and stick to it.

The eight creature lands of the deck represent a very effective angle of attack, so always pay close attention to which Nexus they are sitting on. You can die from poison out of nowhere from either Ravager’s modular or the double black costed activated ability on Cranial Plating, and the Blinkmoth Nexus can pump even Inkmoth.

Keep an eye out for Blood Moon out of their sideboard if you happen to play a deck that is weak to it.


Sideboard Options


Burn

A very linear deck with one simple goal: reduce your opponent’s life total to 0 as fast as possible using hasty creatures and direct burn spells. While dedicated lifegain, Kitchen Finks and Lightning Helix for instance, is great for obvious reasons, let us talk about other ways to get an edge in the matchup.

First of all, your mana base is super important. Some decks can afford to run a lot of basics and fastlands (Spirebluff Canal and its’ friends), and this is a great start to beating Burn – actually forcing them to do the full twenty damage to you. You need to watch out though, because sometimes fetching a basic instead of shockland will cost you tempo and there for indirectly life in the long run. That brings me to the next point.

You need to establish a clock against Burn and not give them too many draw steps to find enough gas to finish you off. Delve creatures, Tarmogoyf, Master of Etherium, Thought-Knot Seer and Reality Smasher are all great at pressuring their life total at a fast pace.

Because Burn needs a critical mass of relevant cards, one-for-one answers are good against it. Spell Snare‘ing an Eidolon of the Great Revel, Fatal Push‘ing a Goblin Guide or Inquisition of Kozilek‘ing away a Boros Charm are all great plays that improve your odds of beating it. The more you trade spells one for one with the deck, the more firmly you put your self in the driver seat.

Sideboard Options

Please share all the inside information you have about the above decks. Sharing knowledge is power! Thank you all for reading, and I’ll see you next time where I cover three more decks you can be sure to face in your next Modern event!

If you want more Modern action, tune in to my twitch channel and follow me on twitter!