Daniel Ward winning GP Toronto

Meet the Pros: Daniel Ward

Hey Dan and first of all, huge congratulations on your well deserved victory this weekend! For those unfamiliar with you, can you give a quick introduction of your self? From professional life to magical accomplishments.

I am a Veteran of the US Navy, now working for a drug and alcohol recovery center. Magic has always been a passion to me from the kitchen table to the Pro Tour (I just qualified for my 10th). I have now top 8’ed in five Grand Prix and top 8’ed a World Magic Cup Qualifier.

You managed to take down the Grand Prix in Toronto this weeking piloting Green/White Hexproof. Looking at your list, a few card choices stand out. Talk about the Leylines in the main deck, and Dromoka’s Command and the two copies of Seal of Primordium in the sideboard.

The Leylines in the main deck have always been a consideration depending on the metagame. After speaking with friends about the deck,  I made the decision that it was prime for this weekend. Dromoka’s Command was a card that was put in the deck thanks to my friend and trip mate Chris Juilano. I had room for two cards in my sideboard and wanted them to be high impact. With Command comes so much flexibility and it took us about an hour on the ride up to go over all applications which we obviously missed some. In this tournament I did everything from have my opponent sacrifice his Phyrexian Unlife, prevent all damage from Secure the Wastes (Command needs two targets) and have my opponent sacrifice Search for Azcanta, fight Goblin Guide plus have my opponent lose his Eidolon of the Great Revel. Seal of Primordium was something I’m not a big fan of, but if you watched the finals I’m sure glad I had them. So the big thing is they deal with Chalice of the Void while being on board pumping your creature with Ethereal Armor. Pretty much when it’s good it’s great. Also with Affinity and Lantern being popular they are added hate which is great.

According to my research, this weekend wasn’t the first time you sleeved up hexproof creatures and auras at a Modern tournament. Tell us why it was the right choice for this weekend.

In my opinion, Bogles is always good, but in some cases great. This weekend I really liked it since I thought there would be more hate for Lantern and just simply not enough players willing to pick Lantern up (thank god because that matchup is miserable). Humans performed the best at the Pro Tour and going in to the tournament I thought that matchup was a bye, but I was surprised it was way closer. So I thought people would either play Humans or play a deck that beats Humans which is great for a deck with mostly untargetable creatures.

On the flipsde, which metagame changes would make Bogles a bad choice in the future?

I think if people want to beat any deck in Modern, they can. But Bogles is worse when combo is good. Bogels is by definition a fair deck and has trouble when the unfair ones are at the top.

I know you have enjoyed Standard a lot over the years. If you were to give your best sales speech to convince players to play Standard, despite chaotics printings and bannings the last few years, what would it sound like?

My Standard soap box goes as follows. If you like change and not getting bored with playing the same deck, I think you have found a format to enjoy. It’s wide open right now, and the game play is very fun. I think from a deck building standpoint, it’s also a format that allows a shifting meta game.

Jace, the Mind Sculptor and Bloodbraid Elf just got unbanned in Modern. Thoughts?

My thoughts are I do not understand why they would do anything to shake up a format that has finaly been stable and awesome for a while. With that said, I think Bloodbraid Elf is fine to come off, and it will have impact, but not change too much. With Jace, the Mind Sculptor I’m just shaking my head. This card is potentially format warping, and I predict it will make it back on the banned list again.

Thank you so much for taking your time to take part in this interview. If you have any sponsor, twitter handle or twitch stream to share, now is the time!

Twitter is @Bigward28, stream shoutout my friend Kappolo42, And lastly #Goonsquad.

A fanboy goes to the Pro Tour Part 1

What a trip I’ve had. I went to the US not only to compete in my first ever Pro Tour, but also to play 3 Grand Prix and hang out with two of my best friends. That sounds great but it turned out to be so much more. I will be name dropping a lot of professional players today, partly because I made friends and hung out with some of them so they are a part of the journey, but also because being a Magic pro is one of my dreams.

So meeting all these people who have the life that I hope to have was awesome and I don’t want to kid me or you by saying that I just met some normal people like myself. Of course they are still people but I don’t think there is anything wrong with having idols, and it was a big part of my trip. There won’t be much strategic magic content, as I wanted to try a different kind of article. I hope you enjoy my story!

Let’s start at the beginning with Oscar Christensen, Christoffer Larsen (who is becoming one of these awe-inspiring pros) and I arriving in Phoenix Thursday evening before the Limited GP. Chris was staying with Team Genesis/Revelation so me and Oscar went to our Travelodge. It is one of many cheap American hotel chains and if you haven’t had the displeasure, don’t worry. Luckily we would not be spending much time there, but I managed to get dropped from one draft because of their “high speed wi-fi”.

I had brought a couple of boxes of Ixalan so I spent Friday trying to get some team drafts going. Oscar introduced me to Luis Salvatto and so I got to team draft with him, Thiago Saporito, Marcos Freitas, Sebastian Pozzo, Dan Ward, Vitor Grassato and Simon Nielsen over two drafts. I did manage to embarrass myself on my way to 0-3 in the first one by Simon killing my Deathless Ancient, saying out loud that I could just get it back, after which I just forgot to take it back and losing the game and match because of it. Oh well, at least Dan said he would let me know if they went to play basketball in Albuquerque. I have played basketball for many years and had heard of these high pro point games so this was a quite high priority goal for the trip already in the bag.

The GP itself went poorly as my RG dino deck splashing Gishath, Sun’s Avatar didn’t manage to get to 6 wins. I did manage to play and attack with Gishath, put Thundering Spineback, Snapping Sailback and Regisaur Alpha into play, draw the second Spineback next turn to attack for 38.

For the Sunday PTQ I played a Temur Black deck with 2 Skysovereign, Consul Flagship and no Glorybringer, with two River’s Rebuke in the sideboard. This led to an awkward situation since someone from team Team Genesis/Revelation saw me play and concluded that Chris had given their tech away. Now I don’t want to make a big deal out of this, but all of these things were available from just looking at MTGO league 5-0 decklists, which I had actually done leading up to the trip.

I wasn’t sure which version of energy to play and I did talk to him about it, but all the information was still available. Funnily, the biggest piece of information I hadn’t gotten from the online decklists was to bring in Rebuke in the mirror, but I knew that from watching Joel Larsson and Paul Dean play the mirror in their hotel lobby; hardly an information bunker.

The PTQ went smoothly until my name wasn’t in the pairings for round 3 or 4. I went to the scorekeepers and was told that I had indeed been dropped. They re-enrolled me but to disrupt as few matches as possible, I was paired down, which I had also been the round before. Now, I am fine with this procedure, the problem was that I’m no information bunker myself so when I sat down for the last round of swiss against the only other undefeated player in our pod, I told him that I had been paired down twice. He was playing tokens and after two long games we had little time left for the decider.

It can be dangerous to speculate about people’s motives but the fact was that he played very slowly in the last game, taking a long time to shuffle for every Attune with Aether and Renegade Map. We drew a game that I’m certain I would have won (I had Planeswalkers and plenty of creatures and drew both of my Rebukes) and I came second on breakers. I was pretty bitter at that point but mostly at myself, because I should have just called a judge to watch for slow play on turn one of game three. It is one of my biggest flaws as a player and one of the things I am focusing on getting better at; when in doubt, call a judge. It’s what they’re there for and it’s hard for it to go worse for you than if you don’t. Anyway, at least Vitor Grassato won the tournament so the invite stayed in the Snapcardster family.

While in Phoenix we got to talking with 3 Swedish guys there, Elias Watsfeldt, Niklas Dahlquist and David Stenberg. They didn’t test with anyone so they sort of joined our group of me, Oscar, Jake Haversat and Piotr “Kanister” Glogowski. It is hard to describe to people who haven’t met him but Niklas is one of the funniest people I have ever met. He is pretty quiet but he makes these ridiculous comments with a brilliant poker face. One night we were in a bar with Chris, Corey Baumeister and a couple of his friends, and we talked about where each of us were from. Out of nowhere Niklas asks “just to be clear, am I the only one from Afghanistan?” More from him later.

Monday morning, Oscar and I headed to the airport for the 45 minute flight to Alberquerque. Tuesday Piotr joins us and we get to the task of figuring out what to play. I was pretty sure I would be playing some form of energy and I think so was Piotr. Oscar was torn between energy and Esper Gift, Niklas and David were on RB aggro and Elias had a UW Approach deck that splashed black for Fatal Push with the help of Field of Ruin to both get a Swamp and turn on revolt. Aside from the mana I think it was actually quite similar to the deck that won GP Atlanta a week later.

Multiple times during the week Elias proclaimed that he was done with the deck but he kept falling victim to the sunken cost fallacy; he had put so much work into it that he didn’t want to go to waste by not playing the deck. In the end, I convinced him to just play Temur Black like us and he was rewarded with an 11-5 finish and invite to the next Pro Tour.

 

Trying to decide which of my friends to root for


He didn’t even do the best out of our group as Piotr just kept winning and winning until he had secured a spot in the FREAKING TOP 8 OF THE PRO TOUR!!! I couldn’t believe it. A guy I tested with and who played the same 75 as me had top 8’ed the Pro Tour. This is also a guy who is 11-1 and playing against a Hall of Famer, crews his Skysovereign and when it eats a Harnessed Lightning, he crews it again with itself, just because it’s a legal play and makes no difference! This guy’s penchant for screwing around is the stuff of legends and I look forward to hanging out with him again. Make no mistake, though, he is great at Magic, just look at the year he is putting together, and I was ecstatic for him. For reference, here is what we ended up playing:

Planeswalkers (2)
Vraska, Relic Seeker

Creatures (21)
Longtusk Cub
Servant of the Conduit
Rogue Refiner
Whirler Virtuoso
Bristling Hydra
The Scarab God

Spells (13)
Attune with Aether
Blossoming Defense
Harnessed Lightning
Abrade
Supreme Will

Artifacts (2)
Skysovereign, Consul Flagship
Lands (22)
Botanical Sanctum
Spirebluff Canal
Blooming Marsh
Aether Hub
Rootbound Crag
Sheltered Thicket
Forest
Mountain
Island
Swamp

Sideboard (15)
River's Rebuke
Nissa, Steward of Elements
Negate
Cartouche of Ambition
Deathgorge Scavenger
Jace's Defeat
Confiscation Coup
Chandra's Defeat
Appetite for the Unnatural

I realise that my story is getting rather long so you’ll see how I did at the Pro Tour and the ensuing Grand Prix in part 2. Hope you enjoyed so far, but I’d like any feedback you have in the comments or on social media. Thanks for reading!