Winning Eternal Clash with Four Color

Hello and welcome back to another Legacy article with a fresh tournament experience to talk about.

A facebook post popped up about a Legacy tournament a four hour drive away from my house, in the German city of Flensburg, and I started to search for travel companions a week in advance. I still had my trusty Four Color Control deck in my bagpack after my top 4 finish at Danish Legacy Masters and decided to run the same 75 back. Never change a winning team, right?

I’ll not go into too much detail about my particular list, because I’ve talked about it a lot in previous articles, but instead I want to focus on what I learned playing against this super diverse field of Legacy decks. For reference, here are the top 8 lists from the event.

Czech Pile by Andreas Petersen

Creatures (13)
Leovold, Emissary of Trest
Snapcaster Mage
Baleful Strix
Deathrite Shaman

Spells (27)
Lightning Bolt
Murderous Cut
Fatal Push
Kolaghan's Command
Brainstorm
Force of Will
Hymn to Tourach
Preordain
Jace, the Mind Sculptor
Lands (20)
Badlands
Bayou
Island
Swamp
Tropical Island
Bloodstained Mire
Volcanic Island
Underground Sea
Polluted Delta
Scalding Tarn

Sideboard (15)
Pyroblast
Hydroblast
Red Elemental Blast
Blue Elemental Blast
Surgical Extraction
Grafdigger's Cage
Flusterstorm
Marsh Casualties
Toxic Deluge
Thoughtseize

Burn

I have played this matchup several times online, but never at a premier event in real life. Playing against a deck with aggressive one drops, Eidolon of the Great Revel and a full playset of Price of Progress might sound like a nightmare, but I’m actually really comfortable being paired vs. Burn.

First of all you need to kill their first creature fast to avoid taking a lot of damage and being finished off by burn spells. Aside from the obvious reasons, you also need fodder in the graveyard for Deathrite Shaman. You want to either gain life or force them to kill it – effectively the same thing.

Obviously, cards like Hymn to Tourach and Force of Will are good at denying them resolved burn spells, but even Kolaghan’s Command can help out by minimising their resources. Against a hellbent opponent, you can disrupt their drawstep if they draw a creature or sorcery, and that will be relevant in close games.

Playing against Price of Progress can be tricky, so make sure to fetch out basic lands when you can afford to. Deathrite Shaman fixes a lot of color issues, so prioritise your lifetotal over perfect mana.

Establishing a clock is also important, because they will reduce your lifetotal to 0 given enough time. The best way to do this is Leovold, Emissary of Trest which conveniently will draw you cards when targeted.

With cheap interaction (2 blasts and 2 Flusterstorm), sideboarded games will be easier. Also note that Murderous Cut kills Eidolon free of charge.


BUG Control

I had a great semi final match against BUG Control, which was basically my list without the Kolaghan’s Command and the Pyroblast in the sideboard. The fact that he couldn’t run any of these cards means a few things.

Command lets me grind very well in combination with either Snapcaster Mage and Baleful Strix, so I will be favored in a long game. It even turned out he played Umezawa’s Jitte which was just icy on my cake.

Pyroblast lets me answer haymakers like Leovold and Jace, the Mind Sculptor cleanly on the stack before my opponents gets any value from them. This means that a resolved Jace, unless I’m horribly behind, is often game over for the BUG deck. It also means that Leovold will always grant me card advantage.

The morale of the story is that Deathrite Shaman lets you play four colors without problems and that the red cards are very important in grindy matchups.


Grixis Delver

In my quarter final match I’m paired against Grixis Delver. I love this matchup because of the close games is provides and the numerous small yet important decisions you have to make during each turn cycle. But I wanted to include this, because a few interesting situations occurred that stuck with me.

My opponent is clocking me with a flipped Delver of Secrets backed up by Wasteland and soft counters. He has seen my hand containing Lightning Bolt and Kolaghan’s Command when I try to kill his creature with the Bolt. He counters it with a Force of Will and proceeds to Wasteland my only red source. The point is that you never want to Force of Will a Lightning Bolt, but out of respect for my superior lategame and card advantage he saw it as his most likely route to victory; trying to get lucky that I didn’t find another red source in time. I love playing a deck that incentivizes opponents to make these high risk plays, because when they don’t work out, I’m heavily favored to win the game.


Weakness and Cheap Interaction

The weakness of Four Color Control is when you’re being overwhelmed early by combo decks where your expensive cards sit in hand doing nothing. I haven’t really thought about that for a while, but my matchup in the finals of Omni Sneak was kind enough to remind me. I sideboarded in the following against him:

   


Yeah, that’s a whole lot of CHEAP disruption. My philosophy against combo is that I feel like I’m winning games where I don’t die on the first few turns. Therefore, playing one-mana cards out of the sideboard to accompany Force of Will and Hymn to Tourach is crucial. In game two I even waited to play my Deathrite Shaman until turn two, because I wanted to keep up Flusterstorm plus Force of Will at all times. This is not to say it was a super clever play on my part, but only to emphasize the importance of getting to play a longer game with this deck and making plays that allow you do to so.

Until next time, may all your games end in double digit turns.

Andreas Petersen

Andreas Petersen

Content Producer at Snapcardster
With national titles in Legacy and Vintage, multiple Grand Prix money finishes in Modern and a newly found affinity for 1v1 Commander and Pauper, Andreas has an opinion about every constructed format except Standard.
Andreas Petersen

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2 comments on “Winning Eternal Clash with Four Color

  • Thanks for the good read. What is your plan against Lands with this list? You need to both deal with Loam, Punishing Fire (Surgicals of course, but 2 is not a lot) and Marit Lage. It seems difficult to beat Marit Lage, when you don’t have Diabolic Edict. Block with Strix, bounce with Jace is the plan?

    Reply
    • Yeah, that’s the thing with control decks that took me several years to learn. You can’t beat everything, and if you try to do that, you will lose percentages across the field. So right now we’re hoping to dodge 20/20 matchups or draw very well. Leovold or Deathrite+Force of Will can beat Punishing Fire, and the 20/20 is beatable with the line you talked about. I won my last two matchups against BG Depths by doing this. I think it’s a 20/80 matchup.

      My list pays attention to the top 5-8 decks in the format and against the rest I’ll live with the results.

      Reply

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