Hello and welcome back to an actual article from my hand. I’m taking a small break from the interviews to share some mixed thoughts about the way I approach the game. I have come a long way since I started playing, and I feel like sharing my experiences will be beneficial for you reading, but also for me putting my thoughts on paper. All of them has contributed to make me the player I am today, and adopting even one or two of these perspectives will without a doubt make you a better player. Note that the order of these commandments are random.


1. Don’t be too results oriented

Unexpected Results

If you 5-0 a League on Magic Online, it doesn’t mean that your deck is the flawless. If you 1-3 a League, it doesn’t mean that your deck sucks. Maybe you won a lot of die rolls, maybe your opponents mulliganned a lot, maybe you drew your sideboard cards in your opening hand in games two and three or the other way around. Get a big enough sample size with your deck to have an educated opinion before jumping to conclusions. I see many players, even good ones, switching decks after a Grand Prix because they didn’t get a good finish. If you switch deck right after a big tournament that you prepared for, your preparation wasn’t good enough.


2. Be better at evaluating when you win

1996 World Champion

It’s easy to try and evaluate a close, important match where you lost, because we find it natural to look for reasons that something bad happens to us. We assume that we must have played sub-optimally or incorrectly, simply because we lost the match. Accept that this is not always the case and be better at looking at the matches you won. The natural behavior after a sweet victory is to feel relief or happiness, but I learned a ton by desecting those games without taking the end result into consideration.

3. Don’t be proud and stubborn

Stubborn Denial

This is something I’m still guilty of practicing, but observing that problem is the first step to improvement. When I get an idea for a deck or sideboard card, I fall in love with it like it’s my new born child. I will ruthlessly defend it when met with critique or raised eye brows like my life depended on it sometimes losing what should be the focus. What I should be doing in these cases is embracing the constructive criticism and use it as a “reality check” to confirm a good idea or feedback to throw away a bad one. Being innovative is great, but don’t fall in love with your ideas. Your peers are here to help you.

4. Be a team player

Fortunately, I learned this many years ago, and it has severely boosted my joy of playing Magic. When I do well, I’m happy and Magic feels very rewarding. When you do badly, if you’re not a team player, you will feel horrible and the negativity makes you unpleasant to be around. Whenever I’m knocked out of an event, I like to stay around and root for and help out my closest friends. Maybe help them scout the opposition, bring them a bottle of water and spectate their matches to cheer them on. If you implement this, all of your Grand Prix trips will feel rewarding regardless of your own performance, and your Magic buddies might even turn into important friends outside of the game.

5. Focus on things you can control

Control Magic

I frequently hear a lot of players talk about circumstances that are out of their control when talking about a match. You can’t do anything about your opponent having the perfect curve in limited or the equivalent in any constructed format. Some percentage of the time it’ll happen, and even the best player in the world would have no chance. I view this as something we sign on an invisible waiver when entering a Magic tournament under “terms and conditions”.

6. The glass is half full, not half empty

Scourglass

When browsing social media or walking through a tournament hall, you will often read or hear comments like “I lost my win-and-in for top 8”, “I was two pro points away from Gold” and “I finished 17th on tiebreakers” with a very negative tone or a crying emoticon. To me this is a very bad habit on the Magic community because it influences the upcoming players a lot. Here is how the above statements would sound in a more positive and constructive way:

“I’m super excited that I top 16’d that Grand Prix!”, “I was only a few points from hitting Gold, so that will be my goal for next season” and “12-3 is a great result that I’m proud of”.

I’m not saying that this is easy to adopt, but we should all strive to make Magic more positive.

7. You play against other Magic players, not immortals

Deicide

The pairings go up, and you learn that you have a feature match against Seth Manfield. A lot of newcomers and semi-pros will already mentally add one in the loss column, but in reality they should just focus on the game and trust their preparation. Yes, the absolute top level opposition will make very few mistakes and punish immediately for yours, but the gap is not as big as most players think. In matchups like this, I have mostly seen two things happen. Either the newcomer/semi pro will play too conservatively, respecting opposing bluffs and giving too much credit to the platinum pro or the newcomer/semi pro will find it necessary to apply a “Hail Mary” strategy because they feel they can’t win a “normal” game of Magic. If you can play your game like you did last round against Average Joe when getting paired against top level players, you’re in a good spot to take it down.

8. Networking is great in multiple ways

Thopter Spy Network

Most of us started playing Magic because of social reasons where the competitive nature came into play much, much later. Once you get to a certain level, your Magic friends will be the ones you bounce ideas off of and the ones you travel with to tournaments. By being friendly and not just minding your own business, a lot of doors will open for you. Whether you need cards for your RPTQ deck, need a couch to sleep on when traveling overseas or want a qualified opinion about a new idea of yours, a good network and group of friends of similar (or better) skill level around you is just what the doctor ordered. Remember you have the same function for them, so this is not a just a selfish perspective.

9. Use the internet, but give credit

Credit Voucher

Magic anno 2018 lets you find a good decklist with just a quick google search. While this is true for everyone and that should even the playing field, that information is still free for you. While the deckbuilder might have spent 100 hours coming up with ideas and testing, you just loaded it up on Magic Online after a few minutes. This is of course perfectly legal, also ethically, but if you manage to do well with a copied list, at least take your time to credit the creator on social media or a private message on facebook. They will feel great, and you obviously feel great because you just won without putting in too much hard work.

10. Set realistic goals

Reality Smasher

There is absolutely nothing wrong with using personal goals as motivation, but there are a few pit falls here. You need a more or less objective way to determine what a “realistic” goal is for you, and if you over- or underrate yourself, the whole point of setting goals is invalid. When (not “if”, because no one succeeds every single time) you fail, you need a very strong psyche to get back in the saddle. I suggest working a lot on dealing with failure and tweaking your expectations. As an example, “I want to make as few mistakes as possible and see where that takes me” is a lot better goal for a tournament than “I want to play on Sunday, otherwise the trip is wasted”.

Thank you so much for reading this, and hopefully you can implement some of it to upgrade the way you approach the game.

What are your MTG commandments that I should learn?

Andreas Petersen

Author Andreas Petersen

Andreas is probably better known as "ecobaronen" on MTGO. After 2nd place of Team Trios #GPMadrid playing Modern he's heading to his second Pro Tour in Minneapolis this year. Andreas has an opinion about every constructed format except Standard.

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